Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer

Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer

Annual Report to the Nation


We are pleased to announce the release of the latest Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer. The Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer represents a collaborative effort from senior researchers at ACS, CDC, NAACCR, and NCI to produce current and comprehensive trends in cancer incidence and mortality. Our 23rd Report was led by ACS and is currently available as an on-line pre-publication copy.

The purpose of this report is to produce the most up-to-date and comprehensive trends in cancer incidence and mortality. Each year we also focus on a special topic. This year we produced two reports: Part I focuses on national statistics; Part II focuses on our the economic burden associated with cancer care.

The Annual Report to the Nation is a collaborative endeavor by leaders in the cancer surveillance field. Each year representatives from the American Cancer Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Cancer Institute, National Center for Health Statistics, NAACCR, and invited scientists analyze the latest cancer rates from NAACCR and other sources to report on the most recent cancer trends in the US. A special focus on a cancer of interest is selected annually for in-depth analysis. These reports are published in scientific journals.

The Current Report:

 Highlights from the reports:

  • Overall cancer incidence rates were higher among men than women in every racial and ethnic group, except Asian/Pacific Islander population, where the rates were similar.  

  • Overall cancer incidence rates were slightly lower among Black people than White people.  

  • In contrast, overall cancer death rates were higher among Black people than White people.   

  • Incidence and death rates of liver cancer were previously increasing, but data show rates have stabilized among both men and women.   

  •  Two-year relative survival for advanced-stage melanoma cases diagnosed during 2001-2009 was stable, but it increased 3.1% per year for those diagnosed during 2009-2014. 

  • Two-year relative survival only slightly increased for early- and intermediate-stage melanoma cases diagnosed during 2001-2014 (0.03% and 0.4% per year, respectively).  

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