NAACCR / IACR Combined Annual Conference 2019

NAACCR / IACR Combined Annual Conference 2019


NAACCR / IACR Combined Annual Conference, June 9 – 13, 2019, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Welcome to Vancouver!

The North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) is pleased to invite you to attend the combined conference of NAACCR and IACR (International Association of Cancer Registries) for 2019. This is a unique opportunity for professionals to network with colleagues conducting similar work globally. The conference will take place June 9 – 13, 2019, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. NAACCR and IACR welcome submissions from colleagues, health professionals, and students interested in cancer surveillance, research, and registry operations.

Registration is Now Open!

If the room block if full when you attempt to reserve your room, please check back. Rooms often become available as NAACCR and IACR members’ travel plans change.

Earlybird rate for NAACCR / IACR Members or Hospital Registrars: $495 before May 1; $595 May 1 or after.

Exhibitors: $495

Non-NAACCR / Non-IACR Member Rate: $595

Student* or Retired NAACCR Individual Member: $180 before May 1; $250 May 1 or after.

Accompanying Person Registration: $195*

NAACCR members, please log in to your MyNAACCR before registering to receive your member rate.
All rates are in US dollars. *Restrictions apply.

When you submit your abstract you will be prompted to enter your MyNAACCR Username and Password. If you do not have one you will have the option to create an account. If you have forgotten your credentials you will have the option to recover them.

Abstract System Access (Abstract Reviewer Access and Speaker Forms)  Call for Abstracts Instructions and Presentation Guidelines

The North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) and the International Association of Cancer Registries (IACR) are pleased to invite you to submit abstracts for oral or poster presentation at the combined conference of NAACCR and IACR for 2019. The 2019 conference will provide attendees with the opportunity to learn from national experts in cancer surveillance, cancer registry operations, and cancer research. This is a unique opportunity for professionals to network and learn from colleagues conducting similar work around the world. Sessions will explore the new era in cancer surveillance from multiple perspectives. The conference will take place June 9 – 13, 2019, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

NAACCR and IACR welcome submissions from colleagues, health professionals, and students interested in cancer surveillance, research, and registry operations. Anyone whose abstract is accepted for poster presentation may be considered for a NAACCR Poster Award. Students who meet eligibility criteria may be considered for a Student Oral or Poster Presentation Award. In addition, oral presenters who meet the criteria for the Enrico Anglesio Award will be eligible to compete for this prestigious award at the 2019 conference.

Abstracts for oral presentations and/or posters are encouraged in the following topic areas:

Epidemiologic Studies Using Cancer Surveillance Data

  • Descriptive Epidemiology
  • Cohort Studies
  • Survival Studies
  • Cancer in special populations
  • Cancer in populations around the world
  • Cancers with changing or unusual patterns

New Directions

  • Visioning the future of cancer surveillance
  • Tissue repositories, biomarkers, prognostic factors
  • Technologic and scientific advances and innovations
  • New and emerging methods of data collection
  • Data collection in rural and remote areas

Tools for Cancer Registries

  • Statistical tools and methods
  • Estimating prevalence
  • Data visualization tools
  • Trends, projections, and estimating cancer burden
  • Innovative analytical methods

Childhood Cancers

  • Staging system
  • Surveillance issues specific to children
  • Epidemiology

Challenges & Solutions in Data Management

  • Using ancillary systems for core data management
  • Maintaining privacy & confidentiality
  • Variables for core cancer dataset
  • Transitioning to XML

Advanced Data Collection

  • Updates on international staging systems
  • Collection of recurrence and progression data
  • Collection of Treatment data

Data Collection and Operations

  • Data quality, control, & standards
  • Innovative data collection and/or consolidation
  • Overcoming issues with data sharing

Cancer Control

  • Targeting populations for intervention
  • Approaches for estimating cancer burden
  • Using registry data in a clinical setting
  • Obesity, HPV, or tobacco-associated cancers

Abstract Submission Closed.  Please consider submitting an abstract for 2020!

Accepted abstracts and posters will be posted on the NAACCR website after the conference. Please note that only registered conference participants may present at an oral session or display a poster.

For questions regarding the Call for Abstracts or electronic submission of abstracts, please contact Dr. Recinda Sherman, NAACCR Program Manager of Data Use and Research, at rsherman@naaccr.org; 1-217-698-0800 Ext. 6. Complete information on the conference and the pre-conference workshops will be communicated by email in February. Thank you for your participation and see you in Vancouver!

 

Sincerely,

The NAACCR / IACR 2019 Annual Conference Program Committee

TimeAbstract #SessionCoordinators / Speaker
JUNE 9-13, 2019
SUNDAY, JUNE 9
PRE-CONFERENCE
8:30 am - 5:30 pmSEER*Stat Basic Software TrainingSteve Scoppa, Senior Systems Analyst, Information Management Services, Inc.
SEER*Stat Basic Training is an introduction to SEER*Stat. The course covers case listing, frequency, and rate sessions. This course also a basic overview of age-adjustment and some key analytic fields. Joinpoint regression software and an introduction to Delay-Adjustment is also included.
8:00 am - 5:00 pmNAACCR Board of Directors Meeting
12:00 pm - 1:30 pmNAACCR Board / Chairs Working Lunch Meeting
8:30 am - 5:30 pmIntroduction to METRIC 1.0 Software to Measure the Cancer Health Environment The course objectives are to understand the rationale, underlying theory, and implications of environmental cancer metrics for cancer research, prevention and control. Attendees will be able to access and use the METRIC software as well as data already available in METRIC, including data layers from esri, Urban Design for Health, and public resources as well as many other objectives.Geoffrey M. Jacquez, Pierre E Goovaerts
1:00 pm - 5:00 pmMatch*Pro Training: Navigating the New Linkage Software This course will provide instruction on the use of Match*Pro linkage software developed by IMS, Inc. Attendees will learn about basic linkage concepts, receive instruction on Match*Pro software functionality, and have the opportunity to perform test linkages and explore the system capabilities.Castine Clerkin, MS, CTR, Program Manager of Virtual Pooled Registry, NAACCR
MONDAY, JUNE 10
PRE-CONFERENCE
NAACCR / IACR Committee and Partner Meetings
Rooms will be available for Steering Committees as well as work groups, task force groups, and subcommittee meetings that fall under each Steering Committee.
9:00 am - 5:30 pmIACR (International Association of Cancer Registries) Board of Directors Meeting
8:30 am - 5:30 pmAdvanced SEER*Stat Software Training/SEER*Prep Presentation SEER*Stat Advanced Topics covers survival, limited-duration prevalence, multiple primary analysis, and left-truncated life tables analysis using SEER*Stat. Presentation of usage of SEER*Prep software to create SEER*Stat databases with NAACCR and international incidence data.Steve Scoppa, Senior Systems Analyst, Information Management Services, Inc.
8:00 am - 12:00 pmCollecting Meaningful Qualitative Data: Focus Group Fundamentals and Qualitative Data Analyses This course will provide an overview of qualitative data collection, focus group fundamentals, and qualitative data analyses methods and software for cancer research. The utility of qualitative research and focus groups for enhancing cancer registry operations will be emphasized.Rebecca L Garrow, MPH, Program Manager, Cancer Registry of Greater California
12:00 pm - 4:00 pmTools and Software to Automate and Normalize the Cancer Data Abstraction Workflow This course highlights several tools that can be used to enhance the quality of registry data and to automate certain tasks. Specifically, this course will introduce and demonstrate: 1) National Cancer Institute, NCI’s Observational Research in Oncology Toolbox; 2) DeepPhe natural language processing (NLP) and visualization software; 3) NCI-DOE application programming interface (API); 4) HemOnc chemotherapy regimen ontology.Jeremy Warner
12:00 pm - 7:00 pmInformation Desk, Conference Registration and Check In
1:00 pm - 5:00 pmExhibitor and Poster Set Up
1:00 pm - 8:00 pmCommittee Meetings as Requested
4:00 pm - 5:30 pmProfessional Development Steering Committee Meeting
5:00 pm - 6:30 pmInternational Cancer Registry Meeting (Invitation Only Please)
5:30 pm - 7:00 pmPre-Conference Social
Connect with colleagues and make new connections before you head out for dinner. Get an early opportunity to meet with exhibitors, vendors, and sponsors of the IACR / NAACCR combined conference. We will have a raffle for all attendees. Light appetizers and a cash bar will be available.
TUESDAY, JUNE 11
CONFERENCE: Day 1
6:30 am - 8:00 amBreakfast
7:00 am - 5:00 pmInformation Desk, Conference Registration and Check In
7:00 am - 5:00 pmExhibit Hall Open
7:00 am - 5:00 pmPoster Viewing
8:00 am - 8:30 amWelcome and Opening Ceremonies
8:30 am - 10:00 am

Plenary Session #1:

8:30 am - 9:00 amCancer in First Nations PopulationsDr. Nadine Caron, General and Endocrine Surgeon, Assistant Professor at the University of British Columbia
9:00 am - 9:05 amQ & A
9:05 am - 9:15 am207Ontario Familial Colorectal Cancer Registry: Indigenous Findings, Sehar Jamal, Ontario Cancer Registry, Toronto, ON, Canada
9:15 am - 9:25 am255ESTIMATES OF CANCER INCIDENCE IN SPAIN, 2019, Jaume, Galceran, Tarragona Cancer Registry, Foundation Society for Cancer Research and Prevention (FUNCA), Spanish Network of Cancer Registries (REDECAN), Reus, Spain, ReusSpain
9:25 am - 9:35 am261Cancer Incidence Rates and Trends among Chinese Filipino Japanese and Korean-Americans, Lihua Liu, Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program -USC, Los Angeles, CA, United States
9:35 am - 9:45 am342Childhood cancer incidence in Cuba 2001-2010, Yaima Galan Alvarez, National Cancer Registry of Cuba, Cuba
9:45 am - 10:00 amQ & A
10:00 am - 10:30 amBreak, Exhibitor and Poster Viewing
10:05 am - 10:25 amNAACCR YOUNG Talk #1
66The impact of the delays in the implementation of the 2018 changes on the timeliness of reporting to the Central Registries, Tonya Brandenburg, Kentucky Cancer Registry, Lexington, KY, United States
10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Concurrent Session #1

Epidemiology I
1:A1249GALL BLADDER CANCERS IN INDIA – A REPORT FROM POPULATION BASED CANCER REGISTRIES (1982-2010), Meesha Chaturvedi, INDIAN COUNCIL OF MEDICAL RESEARCH, Bangalore, India
1:A239Early age of onset in 200 lymphoid cancer families, Samantha Jones, Vancouver, BC, Canada
1:A3338Time trend and incidence pattern of Breast Cancer at the Ibadan Cancer Registry, Nigeria over a twenty year period: 1998-2017, Gabriel OgunIbadan, OY, Nigeria
1:A4171International Trends in Female Breast Cancer Incidence and Mortality Rates, 1985-2013, MaryBeth Freeman, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA, United States
Survival I
1:B1245Comparative net survival of elderly patients with cancer: Data from the cancer registry of Guadeloupe F.W.I., Jacqueline DELOUMEAUX, Cancer Registry of Guadeloupe, University Hospital of Guadeloupe, Pointe-à-Pitre, Guadeloupe, GA, France
1:B2114Pancreatic cancer survival trends in the US from 2001 to 2014 by race and stage at diagnosis (CONCORD-3), Maja Niksic, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, England, United Kingdom
1:B3210Colorectal cancer survival disparities in California 1997-2014, Debora Oh, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States
1:B427The burden of cancer in Nova Scotia – an evaluation of loss in expectation of life, Ron Dewar, Nova Scotia Health Authority - Cancer Care Program, Halifax, NS, Canada
1:B5200Trends in survival from metastatic lung cancer in California, 1990-2014, Rosemary Cress, Cancer Registry of Greater California, Sacramento, CA, United States
Bioinformatics I: Software Tools
1:C1136Automatic coding to the 2018 NAACCR Requirements, Jon Patrick, Sydney, NSW, Australia
1:C2175Implementing the 2018 Cancer Registry Data Changes in Kentucky, Clay Campbell, Kentucky Cancer Registry, Lexington, KY, United States
1:C3179Enhancing the User Experience for SEER*DMS, Laura Lourenco, Westat Inc.,
1:C454Auto-Consolidating Tumor related data fields: An update from the SEER*DMS Auto-consolidation workgroup, Bobbi Matt, State Health Registry of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States
Data Quality I
1:D1254Pertinence of the WHO 2010 guideline on NEC diagnosis, Jan Maarten Van Der Zwan, Department of Research, Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organisation (IKNL), Utrecht, The Netherlands, Utrecht, UT, Netherlands
1:D2103Dual Primary Malignancies: A cause of concern, Swarnima Jaitley, New DelhiIndia
1:D3130Developing a REDCap Inquiry System to Facilitate Case Specific Communication between Hospital Registrars and Central Registry Operations Editing Staff, SuAnn McFadden, Utah Cancer Registry, Salt Lake City, UT, United States
1:D4126Louisiana’s Hospital Follow-up Exchange: A Decade of Partnership, Christina Lefante, Louisiana Tumor Registry, New Orleans, LA, United States
Data Use: Patterns of Care
1:E188Assessment of Breast and Colorectal Cancer Surgery in Manitoba, Iresha Ratnayake, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada
1:E2168Methodology of Conducting the Pattern of Ovarian Cancer Care and Survival in the Midwestern Region of the United States, Wilhelmina Ross, Westat, Rockville, MD, United States
1:E3150Treatment of Stage IV Colon Cancer in the U.S.: A Patterns of Care Analysis, Xiang Gao, State Health Registry of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States
1:E457Urban-Rural Variations in Quality of Care and Survival among Cancer Patients in California, Arti Parikh-Patel, California Cancer Reporting and Epidemiologic Surveillance Program, Institute for Population Health Improvement, UC Davis Health, Sacramento, CA, United States
Virtual Tumor Registry & Biospecimens
1:F156Elevating the Science of Cancer Research by Using the Central Cancer Registry as a Virtual Tissue Repository (VTR), Thomas Tucker, Associate Director of the Kentucky Cancer Registry, Lexington, KY, United States
1:F2230USING CANCER REGISTRY INFRASTRUCTURE AND LINKAGE TO BIOBANK FACILITIES TO INVESTIGATE THE ROLE OF INFECTIOUS AGENTS IN THE PROGRESSION FROM OESOPHAGEAL PREMALIGNANCY TO CANCER., Lesley Anderson, Northern Ireland Cancer Registry, Belfast, United Kingdom
Emerging Registries I
1:G1227Cooperation among countries: supporting population- based cancer registries in Latin America, Leslie Mery IACR, FR, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France
1:G2259Implementing a sub-regional virtual cancer registry to support cancer registration in 10 Caribbean Countries, Sarah Quesnel-Crooks
1:G3288IARC Regional Hub for Cancer Registration, Mumbai, India, Atul BudukhMumbaiIndia
1:G4327Problems and Challenges in the newly established Kabul Cancer Registry, Maihan Abdullah, National Cancer Control Program, Kabul, Afghanistan
1:G5257Overcoming challenges related to cancer case identification in rural West Guyana, Penelope Layne, Guyana National Cancer Registry,
Improving Geocoding Quality
1:H1158NAACCR Geocoder Micro Match Status Codes: Criteria for assessing geographic microdata fitness for use in high resolution spatial analysis, Daniel Goldberg, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, United States
1:H2156NAACCR Geocoder Alias Tables: Improving geocoding quality through the inclusion of placename aliases, Daniel Goldberg, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, United States
1:H392Evaluation of Geocoding Quality in Montana: Considerations for Sub-county analysis, Heather Zimmerman, Montana Central Tumor Registry, Helena, MT, United States
1:H4190Comparison of two geocoding approaches to estimate the effect of residential ambient pesticide exposure on prostate cancer, Laura Thompson, Boulder, CO, United States
12:00 pm - 1:30 pmLunch on Your Own
12:00 pm - 1:30 pmMedullary Thyroid Carcinoma Study Luncheon - Sponsor: United BioSource Corp. (Invitation Only Please)
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Plenary Session #2:

1:30 pm - 2:30 pmKeynote Clemmensen Lecture: IARC Vision and Cancer SurveillanceDr. Elisabete Weiderpass, IARC
2:30 pm - 2:35 pmQ & A
2:35 pm - 2:45 pm232Using Artificial Intelligence to improve case ascertainment in a population cancer registry, Catherine Shang Melbourne, VIC, Australia
2:45 pm - 2:55 pm91The Future of Digital Pathology and Cancer Surveillance, Alison Van Dyke, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, United States
2:55 pm - 3:00 pmQ & A
3:00 pm - 3:30 pmBreak, Exhibitor and Poster Viewing
3:05 pm - 3:25 pmNAACCR YOUNG Talk #2
29FUNDAMENTAL LEARNING COLLABORATIVE FOR THE CANCER SURVEILLANCE COMMUNITY (FLccSC), Jill MacKinnon, Florida Cancer Data System, Miami, FL, United States
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Concurrent Session #2

Epidemiological Trends I
2:A1329Geographical and temporal differences in gastric and oesophageal cancer in Europe, Francesco Giusti, European Commission - DG Joint Research Centre, Brussels, Belgium
2:A2283Demographic and Epidemiological Transition and Cancer in India, Aleyamma Mathew, Regional Cancer Centre, Trivandrum, Kerala, IN, India
2:A3107Changing trends in thyroid cancer incidence in Canada: A histologic examination, 1992 to 2016, Larry Ellison, Canadian Cancer Registry, Health Statistics Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada
2:A4262Incidence and mortality of childhood cancer in China from 2000 to 2015, Kexin Sun, National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China
Survival & Biomarkers
2:B1251Worldwide variation in morphology and survival from melanoma of the skin (CONCORD-3), Veronica Di Carlo, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom
2:B2109International comparisons of ovarian cancer survival: should we standardise by histological subtype?, Melissa Matz, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom
2:B3318Geographic variation in pancreatic cancer morphology and survival (CONCORD-3), Maja Niksic, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, England, United Kingdom
2:B4104Ovarian cancer survival by race in the United States (CONCORD-3), Melissa Matz
2:B53Survival trends from melanoma of the skin in the USA, by sex and stage at diagnosis: results for 578, 430 adult patients diagnosed during 2001-2014 (CONCORD-3), Veronica Di Carlo, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom
Bioinformatics II: NAACCR XML
2:C1187Getting Ready for NAACCR XML in 2020, Isaac Hands, Kentucky Cancer Registry, Lexington, KY, United States
2:C274Handling Large NAACCR XML Data Files Using the SEER Data Viewer, Fabian Depry, Information Management Services, Inc., Calverton, MD, United States
2:C342Loading NAACCR XML data into a relational Database, Jeff Reed, Commission on Cancer, Chicago, IL, United States
Leveraging Data Sources
2:D1157Implementation of ePath Reporting in California: Setting Data Quality Standards, Andrea Sipin-Baliwas, Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program -USC, Los Angeles, CA, United States
2:D2152Implementation of ePath Reporting in California: Challenges for Small and Medium-Sized Facilities, Dennis Deapen, Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program -USC, Los Angeles, CA, United States
2:D3154Outpatient Clinic Reporting: Understanding the Landscape and Establishing Reporting Processes, Andrea Sipin-Baliwas, Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program -USC, Los Angeles, CA, United States
Data Use: Treatment
2:E1274The impact of novel agents on multiple myeloma: trends of incidence and mortality in Japan, Yoshiaki Usui, Japan
2:E2314Measuring the implementation of recommendations on patient centred management of localized prostate cancer with population based cancer registration data., Liesbet Van Eycken, Belgian Cancer Registry, Brussels, Belgium
2:E330Methods, Results, and Lessons Learned from Two Postmarketing Drug Safety Surveillance Studies Linking State Cancer Registry Data to Large Pharmacy Databases, David Harris, RTI Health Solutions, Research Triangle Park, NC, United States
2:E4224Developing an Integrated Clinical Decision-making Scheme (ICDS) for Predicting SPCs in Women with Endometrial Cancer: A Retrospective Analysis in Taiwan and Thailand, Chi-Chang Chang, TAICHUNG, Taiwan
Genomics
2:F1306Cancer Registration in the Era of Genomics: Integrating Germline and Somatic Genetic Data into the Cancer Registration System for England, Fiona McRonald, Public Health England, Birmingham, United Kingdom
2:F2173Linked OncotypeDX DCIS test in SEER: Quality assessment and clinical significance, Yao Yuan, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, United States
2:F3174MULTIGENE GENOMIC TESTING (ONCOTYPE DX) AMONG NEW YORK (NY) PROSTATE CANCER PATIENTS, 2015-2016, Jovanka Harrison, New York State Cancer Registry, Menands, NY, United States
2:F490Enhancing Cancer Surveillance: Statewide Collection of Biomarkers and Prognostic Factors, Colorado’s Multi-phase Implementation, Kieu Vu, Colorado Central Cancer Registry, Denver, CO, United States
Quality of Life
2:G1100Changes in Health-Related Quality of Life in Older Women after Diagnosis with Gynecologic Cancer, Amy Klapheke, Cancer Registry of Greater California, Sacramento, CA, United States
2:G2204Influence of depression on treatment and survival: A population-based study for breast cancer patients in Kentucky, Bin Huang, Kentucky Cancer Registry, Lexington, KY, United States
2:G333Impact of Depression and Comorbidity on Suicide for Cancer Patients, Thomas Huang, New Orleans, KY, United States
2:G4209Impact of navigation and neighborhoods on breast cancer survivorship, Debora Oh, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States
2:G5199Do Latinas with breast cancer who live in ethnic enclaves have better or worse survival? Analysis of cancer registry data from California and Texas, Salma Shariff-Marco, San Francisco, CA, United States
Breast Cancers
2:H1278Cancer Surveillance data of Rare Epithelial Breast cancers-A Report from Population Based Cancer Registries in India., Shakuntala, TS, NCDIR, ICMR, BANGALORE, KS, India
2:H2219Breast cancer treatment according to pathogenic variants in cancer susceptibility genes in a population-based cohort, STEVEN KATZ, UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, MI, United States
2:H326Differences in Breast Cancer Survival by Molecular Subtypes in the United States, Nadia Howlader, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD, United States
5:15 pm - 6:15 pmBirds of a Feather
Join us for this lively discussion on the challenges and potential solutions presented. Stimulating topics are being developed and will be posted here in early Spring.
6:30 pm - 9:00 pm2019 IACR / NAACCR Combined Conference Reception
6:30 PMDoors Open
All conference attendees are encouraged to attend the 2019 Opening Reception. This is a great opportunity to meet with friends and colleagues. You will also be sure to meet new acquaintances to expand your professional network. This one of a kind event will offer networking with the international IACR community. This is a "don't miss" event. Entertainment and heavy appetizers will be available to attendees. Cash bar will also be available.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12
CONFERENCE: Day 2
6:30 AM - 8:00Breakfast
7:00 am - 12:00 pmExhibit Hall Open
7:00 am - 12:00 pmPoster Viewing
7:30 am - 12:00 pmInformation Desk, Conference Registration and Check In
12:00 pm - 2:30 pmInformation Desk Only
8:00 am - 9:30 am

Concurrent Session #3

Emerging Cancer Trends
3:A152Lung cancer incidence rates in young women versus young men: A systematic analysis in 40 countries, Miranda Fidler-Benaoudia , American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA, United States
3:A238Global trends in colorectal cancer incidence rates in young adults, Rebecca Siegel, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA, United States
3:A339Global Variation in Prostate Cancer Incidence and Mortality Rates, 1980-2013, MaryBeth Freeman, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA, United States
3:A447U.S. Cancer Statistics Public Use Database — Annual percent change of screening-amenable cancers by state, United States, 2011-2015, Reda Wilson, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, United States
3:A521Lung Cancer Incidence in Young Blacks Versus Whites in the United States, Ahmedin Jemal, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA, United States
Survival II
3:B140Assessing population-based cancer survival trends by using the North American Cancer Survival Index ? United States, 2005–2014, Bozena Morawski, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Boise, ID, United States
3:B2195Exploring the reasons for the persistent cancer survival gap between the UK and Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway and Sweden, Claudia Allemani, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom
3:B327Disease Free Survival for Non-metastatic Colorectal Cancer Cases in three Referral Hospitals in Iran; Interim Report of the CRC Quality Registry Network (QRN-CRC), Mohammad Reza Rouhollahi
3:B4286Education and Stage of Cancer at Diagnosis: A Population-Based Study in South India, Preethi George, Trivandrum, KL, India
High Tech Solutions
3:C141CLOUD-BASED SOLUTION FOR REAL-TIME REPORTING OF CANCER DATA, Joseph Rogers, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, United States
3:C294Auditing HPV Data Quality in SEER Via Text-Mining Algorithm, Rebecca Ehrenkranz, Rockville, MD, United States
3:C3185Text Mining for Data Quality Analysis of Melanoma Tumor Depth, Peggy Adamo, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, United States
3:C4320Supporting precise data analysis without releasing patient records: the Simulacrum in action, Cong Chen, Public Health England, Cambridge, United Kingdom
3:C5293Pseudonymised matching: Robustly linking molecular and prescription data to cancer registry data in England, Brian Shand, United Kingdom
Casefinding
3:D182The Progress of NPCR Audits - what we have done, what we have learned, and where are we going now, Mary Lewis, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, United States
3:D2214Use of Hospital Discharge Data to Increase Reporting of Non-malignant Central Nervous System Tumors, Mary Jane King, Ontario Cancer Registry, Toronto, ON, Canada
3:D3129Early Case Capture of Pediatric and Young Adult Cancers: Considerations for future rapid case ascertainment studies, Mary Anne Lynch, Louisiana Tumor Registry, New Orleans, LA, United States
3:D463Improving Mortality Reporting to State Cancer Registries through National Vital Statistics System Modernization Efforts, Wendy Blumenthal, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, United States
3:D5266Active Case Finding To Achieve Completeness, The Current Model Deployed In Nairobi Population Based Cancer Registry., NATHAN MAUTI, Kenya Medical Research Institute, Nairobi, Kenya
Virtual Pooled Registry
3:E1110VPR-CLS Pilot Testing and Next Steps, Castine Clerkin, North American Association of Central Cancer Registries, Springfield, IL, United States
3:E2111Web Portal for Virtual Pooled Registry Cancer Linkage System (VPR-CLS) Phase I and Phase II Functionality, Don Green, Information Management Services, Inc., Calverton, MD, United States
3:E3127Status of the Templated IRB/Registration Application, implementation of the Central IRB and local context issues, Steven Friedman, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD, United States
3:E4206Cancer Ascertainment by U.S. Population-Based Cancer Registries, Self-Report and Death Certificates in the nationwide U.S. Radiologic Technologists Cohort: A Preliminary Report, Danping Liu, Rockville, MD, United States
Staging
3:F15Essential TNM- Evaluation of a Training Exercise in Sub-Saharan Africa, Michael Odutola, Institute of Human Virology Nigeria, Garki, Nigeria
3:F2297Improvements in national staging ascertainment in England (2011-2016), Michael Eden, National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service, Public Health England,
3:F377Neoadjuvant Treatment Results – Only Part of the Story /The Missing Piece, Donna Gress, American College of Surgeons, American Joint Committee on Cancer, Chicago, IL, United States
3:F4309Population Based Cancer Registry Survival Data Argue for Subdivision of TNM Stage III Prostate Cancer and Merging cT2-subcategories., Liesbet Van Eycken, Belgian Cancer Registry, Brussels, Belgium
Epidemiology: Rare Tumors
3:G1229Rare cancers are also not rare in Asia: The rare cancer burden in East Asia, Tomohiro Matsuda, Japan
3:G2197Primary Malignant Cardiac Tumors in California, Lihua Liu, Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program -USC, Los Angeles, CA, United States
3:G3235Kaposi sarcoma as indicator disease for HIV prevalence in the Netherlands: a population-based study, Vincent Ho, IKNL, Utrecht, UT, Netherlands
Statistical Issues
3:H184A new statistical method for estimating cancer mortality rates by immigration status, Mandi Yu, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD, United States
3:H298The mortality-to-incidence ratio is not a valid proxy for cancer survival, Michel Coleman, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, England, United Kingdom
3:H3294Excess hazard in the Belgian cancer population, Geert Silversmit, Belgian Cancer Registry, Brussels, Belgium
3:H4176Survival Among Adolescents and Young Adults Using JPSurv and SEER9 Data, 1975-2015, Denise Lewis, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, United States
3:H5280Bayesian mapping of cancer mortality in Japan: a small area analysis, Megumi HoriChuo-ku, Tokyo, Japan
9:30 am - 10:00 amBreak, Exhibitor and Poster Viewing
9:35 am - 9:55 amNAACCR YOUNG Talk #3
125From Excel to Exceptional: Interactive Business Intelligence Tool use in the Minnesota Cancer Registry, Paula Lindgren, Minnesota Cancer Reporting System, St Paul, MN, United States
10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Plenary Session #3:

10:00 am - 10:30 amGlobal Aspects of Cancer StagingDr. James Brierley, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto
Staff Physician
10:30 am - 10:40 amQ & A
10:40 am - 11:10 am999Lynne Penberthy, National Cancer Institute
11:10 am - 11:20 amQ & A
11:20 am - 11:50 am221Australian Cancer Atlas – Development and Interpretation, Joanne Aitken
11:50 am - 12:00 pmQ & A
12:00 pm - 1:30 pmLunch on Your Own / Exhibits / Posters
12:30 pm - 1:30 pmNAACCR Business Meeting
All conference delegates are asked to attend the 2019 NAACCR Business Meeting. Important bylaws changes will be voted on (if required) as well as other critical business of the Association. Voting Delegates from their respective organizations are required to attend the NAACCR Business Meeting.
2:00 pm - 4:00 pmIACR Business Meeting
IACR business meeting for IACR members.
2:00 pm - 7:00 pmStatistical Summit Group Meeting (Invitation Only Please)
Operations Summit Group Meeting - Exact time and date coming soon. (Invitation Only Please)
3:00 pm - 6:30 pmBike Tour Activity
This activity requires a separate registration prior to the conference. Attendees will meet in the hotel lobby for an entertaining and active guided bike tour of Vancouver areas of interest. Bike ride registrants will meet in the hotel lobby and take a short 10 minute walk to the bike pick up location. From there, registrants will embark on a guided leisurely paced bike ride. The total bike ride time is approximately 45 minutes. After the ride, registrants will meet back at the starting point and walk back together to the hotel.
REGISTER HERE FOR BIKE RIDE EVENT
3:20 PMMeet in hotel lobby of JW Marriott Parq. Walk to start (10 min.).
4:00 PMStart of bike tour
6:15 PMBike ride tour concludes. Walk to hotel (10 min.).
6:30 PMArrive back at hotel lobby.
4:30 pm - 6:00 pmLeadership Meeting Details TBA (Invitation Only Please)
THURSDAY, JUNE 13
CONFERENCE: Day 3
6:30 am - 8:00 amBreakfast
6:30 am - 7:30 amFree Fun Run / Walk
NAACCR encourages all attendees to take advantage of the NAACCR walk/run. It is estimated that over half of cancer cases can be prevented by lifestyle changes such as exercise, the limitation of tobacco use, and improved nutrition. Meet in the hotel lobby to enjoy a nice 3 kilometer walk or jog to start your day off right!
Food and exercise while meeting with colleagues—what could be more productive and pleasurable?
7:00 am - 11:30 amInformation Desk, Conference Registration and Check In
7:00 am - 3:30 pmExhibit Hall Open
7:00 am - 10:30 amPoster Viewing
7:00 am - 8:00 amGroup Meetings
8:00 am - 10:00 am

Plenary Session #4:

8:00 am - 8:30 amDevelopment of New Regional Cancer Registries in MexicoDr. Alejandro Mohar Betancourt, General Director of Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, México
8:30 am - 8:40 am3172nd Revision of the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology (ICD-O-3.2) – implications for cancer registries and future directions, Ariana Znaor, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France
8:40 am - 8:50 am260DO CLASSIFICATION RULES FOR CODING CANCER SITE IMPACT ESTIMATES OF RATES AND TRENDS?,Goncalo, Forjaz de Lacerda, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, United States
8:50 am - 9:00 am248CANCER SURVEILLANCE IN DINDIGUL DISTRICT IN TAMIL NADU, INDIA, RAJARAMAN SWAMINATHAN, CANCER INSTITUTE (W.I.A), CHENNAI, INDIA, CHENNAI, TN, India
9:00 am - 9:10 am265The economic impact of cancer: EPICOST, a population-based study in Italy, Silvia Francisci, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Roma, Italy
9:10 am - 9:20 amQ & A
9:20 am - 10:00 amNAACCR - IACR Poster and Student Poster Contest Results and Awards
10:00 am - 10:30 amBreak, Exhibitor and Poster Viewing
10:05 am - 10:25 amNAACCR YOUNG Talk #4
182Designing Sub-County Zones for Cancer Surveillance Reporting, David Stinchcomb, Westat, Rockville, MD, United States
10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Concurrent Session #4

Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology
4:A1250Monitoring of Incidence and Mortality of Cancers around Fukushima Nuclear Plant Accident Area: Inter-regional analysis, Tomohiro, Matsuda, Japan
4:A2267Radiation risk of colorectal cancer by anatomical site among atomic bomb survivors: 1958-2009, Hiromi Sugiyama, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima, Japan
4:A3133Investigation of a Possible Link between Pollution from Firefighting Foam and Cancer in the Greater Fairbanks Area, Alaska, David O'Brien, Alaska Cancer Registry, Anchorage, AK, United States
4:A4184Cancer Risk Among Male Florida Firefighters (1981-2014): Evidence from the Florida Firefighter Cancer Registry, David Lee, Florida Cancer Data System, Miami, FL, United States
4:A5343Title: The Camp Lejeune Cancer Incidence Study: A Retrospective Cohort Study, Frank Bove, Division of Toxicology and Human Health Sciences, ATSDR/CDC Atlanta, GA United States
Survival & Hematopoietic Cancers
4:B131Prognostic factors of renal impairment in multiple myeloma patients with nomogram prediction: A population-based study, Muhammed Elfaituri, Faculty of Medicine, Tripoli University, Tripoli, Libya
4:B2326Survival outcomes in adolescent hematologic cancer patients in Estonia: does place of treatment matter?, Keiu Paapsi, Tallinn, Estonia
4:B3118Changes in Life Expectation for Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) Patients, 1985 – 2014: Results from SEER data, Ron Dewar, Nova Scotia Health Authority - Cancer Care Program, Halifax, NS, Canada
4:B4273Trend in survival from leukemia in children, adolescents and young adults in Osaka, Japan: is the age-related gap narrowing?, Kayo Nakata, Osaka International Cancer Institute, Osaka, Japan
4:B51Survival of non-Hodgkin lymphoma by comorbidity status and socio-demographic characteristics: results from a population-based study, Matthew Smith, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom
Collection of Recurrence and Progression Data
4:C162Tracking recurrence in population-based cancer surveillance: Where to start? Literally!, Loria Pollack, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, United States
4:C276Defining Cancer Recurrence in a Population-Based Cancer Surveillance Study, Trevor, Thompson, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, United States
4:C3119Capturing Cancer Recurrences Using Utah Cancer Registry Data, Mia Hashibe, Salt Lake City, UT, United States
4:C4208Predicting recurrence or second breast cancer from linked registry-claims data to augment SEER: The ReCAPSE project, ruth, etzioni, Fred Hutchinson, Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, United States
Data Quality II
4:D1113Opportunities to Improve Place of Birth, Race, and Ethnicity with Electronic Birth Certificate Linkage, Valerie Otto, Utah Cancer Registry Salt Lake City, UT, United States
4:D2216TITLE: Furthering the Understanding of the Burden of Cancer among the American Indian and Alaska Native Population in Maine: Assessing the Impact of Case Identification through IHS Linkage and Differences Due to Case and Regional Inclusion Criteria, Denise Yob, Maine Cancer Registry, Augusta, ME, United States
4:D3122Feasibility of using a patient portal distributed by the statewide cancer registry to collect patient generated health data (PGHD), Mary Charlton, State Health Registry of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States
4:D4102Innovative electronic data capture to collect screening and diagnostic follow-up for women with breast or cervical cancer, Carol Sweeney, Utah Cancer Registry, Salt Lake City, UT, United States
Data Use: Linkage
4:E1141Cancer in Young People in Canada: Broadening the research and surveillance potential by linking to other administrative databases, Shirley Bryan, Health Data Integration - Statistics Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada
4:E2146Early- and late-age onset colorectal cancer in Kentucky: using health administrative claims-linked cancer registry data to better understand risk factors and comorbidities, Julie Townsend, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Chamblee, GA, United States
4:E393Investigating the effects of socioeconomic factors on cancer treatment patterns and outcomes in Canada using individual-level linked national data, April Smith, Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, Toronto, ON, Canada
4:E4149Maximizing research impacts on cancer prevention: an integrated knowledge translation approach used by the Canadian Population Attributable Risk of Cancer (ComPARe) study, Prithwish De, Ontario Cancer Registry, Toronto, ON, Canada
4:E5211Lung cancer incidence and risk factors in never-smoking Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander women: the development of a multilevel integrated dataset of electronic health record, cancer registry, and environmental data, Mindy DeRouen, San Francisco, CA, United States
Prevalence
4:F1264ESTIMATING THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE IN ITALY LIVING AFTER A CHILDHOOD CANCER USING THE SOFTWARE COMPREV, Anna Gigli, Roma, RM, Italy
4:F278Using NAACCR CiNA data to estimate blood cancer prevalence in the United States using more complete geographic coverage and provide local estimates., Christopher Johnson, Cancer Data Registry of Idaho, Boise, ID, United States
4:F379Lifetime risk of developing cancer among Alaska Native people, Sarah Nash, SEER Alaska Native Tumor Registry, Anchorage, AK, United States
SES & Cancer
4:G1215Neighborhood archetypes for understanding disparities in prostate cancer mortality, Mindy DeRouen, San Francisco, CA, United States
4:G222Socio-economic position and comorbidity prevalence among colon, rectum, lung and Hodgkin lymphoma cancer patients in England: a population-based study using cancer registry data and electronic health records, Helen Fowler, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, England, United Kingdom
4:G317The Social Gradient of Cancer Incidence in New York State, Francis Boscoe, Portland, ME, United States
4:G4202Using residential histories to estimate area-based poverty: An exploratory analysis of colon cancer survival in New Jersey., Antoinette Stroup, New Jersey State Cancer Registry, Trenton, NJ, United States
4:G530Adding Value to Registries through Geospatial Big Data Fusion, Timothy Haithcoat, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, United States
Topics in Asian Cancer Surveillance
4:H1316Coming to America: Cancer Trends among Filipinos in Manila and Los Angeles, Andrea Sipin-Baliwas, Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program -USC, Los Angeles, CA, United States
4:H2290Role of population based rural cancer registry Sangrur in the cancer control of Sangrur district of Punjab State, India, Atul Budukh, Mumbai, India
4:H317Liver cancer statistics in China, 2015: An updated estimate based on 368 population-based cancer registries, Lan An, National Cancer Center/National Clinical Research Center for Cancer/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, BEIJING, China
4:H446Cancer registration and its role in cancer prevention and control in China, Wenqiang Wei
12:00pm - 1:00 pmCancer Recurrence and Registry Data Meeting (Open to All)
12:00 pm - 1:30 pmLunch On Your Own, Exhibitor and Poster Viewing
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Concurrent Session #5

Epidemiological Trends II
5:A128Recent trends in prostate cancer in Canada, Allana LeBlanc, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada
5:A2287TRENDS OF CANCER OBSERVED IN A PREMIER INSTITUTE IN MUMBAI, INDIA DURING LAST THREE DECADES, GANESH BALASUBRAMANIAM, TATA MEMORIAL CENTRE, NAVI MUMBAI, MAHARASHTRA, India
5:A381Patterns of cancer incidence and mortality rates and trends in China, Siwei Zhang
5:A4121The rising incidence of testicular cancer among young men in Canada, data from 1971-2015, Darren Brenner
5:A526Trends in cancer incidence in the Republic of Mauritius, 1991-2015, Marvin Koon Sun Pat, Faculty of Science, University of Mauritius, Reduit, Mauritius, Tombeau Bay, PA, Mauritius
Survival & Brain and CNS
5:B120Global trends in survival from astrocytoma in young people: A population-based analysis (CONCORD-3), Fabio Girardi, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, England, United Kingdom
5:B269Relative survival after diagnosis with a primary brain or other CNS tumor in the National Program of Cancer Registries, 2001-2014, Quinn Ostrom, Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States, Houston, TX, United States
5:B370Glioma incidence and survival variation by county-level socioeconomic measures, Jill Barnholtz-Sloan, Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States, Clevland, OH, United States
Epidemiology II
5:C180THERAPY-RELATED ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA FOLLOWING TREATMENT FOR CANCER IN CHILDHOOD: A POPULATION-BASED REGISTRY STUDY, Joanne Aitken
5:C29Quantifying the Risk of Second Primary Melanoma in California, 2000-2015, Eric Stewart, Cancer Registry of Greater California, Sacramento, CA, United States
5:C3332HOW TO INTERPRET THE GEOGRAPHICAL VARIATIONS IN THE INCIDENCE OF BLADDER TUMOURS IN EUROPE, Carmen Martos, European Commission - DG Joint Research Centre,
5:C4319Thyroid cancer epidemiology in the Northeast of São Paulo State, Brazil: a population-based time trends study, Allini Mafra, Barretos Cancer Hospital, Barretos, São Paulo, Brazil
5:C5313Cancer Mortality in the Canadian Armed Forces: Results from the 40-Year Retrospective Canadian Forces Cancer and Mortality Study II (CF CAMS II), Elizabeth Rolland-Harris, Department of National Defence (Canada), Ottawa, ON, Canada
Data Quality III
5:D1142Wilms’ Tumor: The Value of Abstract Text Fields for Determining Prognosis Based on Histology, Martin Whiteside, Tennessee Cancer Registry, Nashville, TN, United States
5:D2163Utilization of Microsatellite Instability Testing and Associated Factors among Colorectal Cancer Patients, Xiaocheng Wu, Louisiana Tumor Registry, New Orleans, LA, United States
5:D3218Evaluating the Utilization of Lower Anogenital Squamous Terminology (LAST) Two-tiered Classification for Pre-invasive Cervical Cancer and Its Impact on Reporting in a Population-Based Cancer Registry, Mei-Chin Hsieh, Louisiana Tumor Registry, New Orleans, LA, United States
5:D467Quality Review of Pancreas Surgery Codes, Jeanne Whitlock, Metropolitan Detroit Cancer Surveillance System,
5:D5172Completeness of molecular testing information among metastatic colorectal cancer patients – a comparison of data sources at an academic medical center, Amanda Kahl, State Health Registry of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States
Data Use: Cancer Control
5:E1151Medical chart review for screening history among women with invasive cervical cancer in three states: CICC Study, 2013-2016, April Greek, Battelle, Seattle, WA, United States
5:E2240Estimating the efficiency of three national cancer screening programmes using the population-based cancer registry data in Slovenia Vesna, Zadnik, Slovenia
5:E3194Cancer Registry collaboration with Cancer Control Program on a population-based survey of Utah cancer survivors, Kimberly Herget, Utah Cancer Registry, Salt Lake City, UT, United States
5:E4315Is there a down staging of female breast and uterine cervical cancers in India? A hospital based analysis, Murali Dhar, Mumbai, MH, India
IACR Surv Mark Study
5:F1139Evolving prognosis since time of colorectal cancer diagnosis: Assessing conditional survival of cancer patients in seven high income countries, Isabelle Soerjomataram, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France
5:F2138Impact of age and stage at diagnosis on ovarian cancer survival across seven high-income countries: A study from the ICBP-SURVMARK-2 project, Isabelle Soerjomataram, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France
5:F3217Progress in cancer survival across Canada: the ICBP Survmark-2 project, Ryan Woods, BC Cancer,
5:F450Progress in cancer survival in seven high-income countries 1995-2014: the ICBP SURVMARK-2 project, Melina Arnold, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France
5:F5137Colorectal cancer survival in seven high-income countries 2010-2014: uncovering the impact of age and stage at diagnosis (the ICBP Survmark-2 project), Melina Arnold, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France
Emerging Registries II
5:G1269A first look at cancer incidence rates and trends in Bermuda over the 10-year period 2007-2016, Katura Horton-Perinchief, Bermuda National Tumour Registry,
5:G2243FINDINGS OF FIRST POPULATION BASED CANCER REGISTRY IN NEPAL, Ranjeeta Subedi, Nepal Health Research Council, Kathmandu, Nepal
5:G332Costs and resources used by population-based cancer registries in the U.S.-Affiliated Pacific Islands, Patrick Edwards, RTI International, Durham, NC, United States
5:G433Cost of Operating Population-based Cancer Registries: Results from Four Sub-Saharan African Countries, Florence Tangka, CDC, Atlanta, GA, United States
5:G5220Role of the Population Cancer Registry in the Observation of Cancer Patients in the Southern Urals - a Large Industrial Region of Russia, Irina Aksenova, Chelyabinsk Regional Center of Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Chelyabinsk Russian Federation
HPV Related Cancers
5:H1117Surveillance of HPV-associated Oropharyngeal Cancers in South Carolina, Stephanie Chiodini, South Carolina Central Cancer Registry, Columbia, SC, United States
5:H2180Cervical cancer in adolescent and young adults in California, 2005-2014, Frances Maguire, California Cancer Reporting and Epidemiologic Surveillance Program, University of California Davis Health, Institute for Population Health Improvement, Sacramento, CA, United States
5:H3252Risk of HPV-related extra-cervical cancers in women with a removed intraepithelial cervical lesion Stefano, Rosso, Italy
5:H4167Monitoring of HPV Genotype Prevalence Ten Years after HPV Vaccine Implementation, Jacqueline Mix, Atlanta, GA, United States
5:H5201Bridging Colorado’s Cancer and Immunization Registries to Improve the Dissemination of a Successful HPV Vaccination Intervention, Amy Mellies, Aurora, CO, United States
3:00 pm - 3:30 pmBreak, Exhibitor and Poster Viewing
3:05 pm - 3:25 pmNAACCR YOUNG Talk #5
Topic coming! Check back soon.
3:30 pm - 5:00 pmExhibit Break Down and Poster Removal
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Plenary Session #5 and Closing Ceremonies

3:30 pm - 4:00 pmHPV and Oral CancersDr. Anil Chaturvedi, Senior Investigator, National Cancer Institute
4:00 pm - 4:10 pm270Long-term survival of patients with prostate cancer in Martinique: Results of a population-based study., clarisse, JOACHIM, Martinique
4:10 pm - 4:20 pm256Adherence to the Thyroid Cancer Guideline 2.0 in the Netherlands, a guideline evaluation using cancer registry data., Jan Maarten Van Der Zwan, Department of Research, Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organisation (IKNL), Utrecht, The Netherlands, Utrecht, UT, Netherlands
4:20 pm - 4:30 pm51Racial Disparities in the Receipt of Guideline Care and Cancer Deaths for Women with Ovarian Cancer, Kathy Cronin, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, United States
4:30 pm - 4:40 pmQ & A
4:40 pm - 5:15 pmIACR Honorary Member Award - NAACCR Constance Percy and Calum Muir Award, IACR Enrico Anglesio PrizeSenior Investigator
5:15 pm - 5:30 pmInvitation to 2020 IACR Meeting - Invitation to NAACCR 2020 Meeting, Philadelphia, PA
5:30 PM2019 IACR / NAACCR Combined Annual Conference Concludes
5:30 pm - 6:30 pmClosing Networking Opportunity
Take advantage of this opportunity to wrap up the conference with colleagues and new connections before you depart.

Basic SEER*Stat Software Training  
Recommended for those new to SEER*Stat and International Members Participants

Sunday, June 9, 2019
8:30 am – 5:30 pm
$275

SEER*Stat Basic Training is an introduction to SEER*Stat. The course covers case listing, frequency, and rate sessions. This course also a basic overview of age-adjustment and some key analytic fields. Joinpoint regression software and an introduction to Delay-Adjustment is also included.

Course Objectives

  • Introduce basic statistical topics in the analysis of cancer registry data.
  • Learn how data can be analyzed using these techniques within the SEER*Stat software.

Requirements

General familiarity with the analysis of registry data. Each participant must bring a laptop with a Windows operating system or a Windows emulator. If an emulator is used, then the participant should test compatibility with SEER*Stat prior to the conference.

Content
Overview of data and basic analyses with SEER*Stat and Joinpoint.

Course Organizer(s)

  • Steve Scoppa, Senior Systems Analyst, Information Management Services, Inc.

 

Introduction to METRIC 1.0 Software to Measure the Cancer Health Environment  

Sunday, June 9, 2019
8:30 am – 5:30 pm
$275

BioMedware, in collaboration with NAACCR, esri, Urban Design for Health, and TechEd, recently completed software and resources for measurement and modeling of the cancer health environment. Funded by a contract from the National Cancer Institute, METRIC was developed in recognition that environmental and public health policy interventions can reduce the burden of chronic disease by encouraging healthy behaviors. Using the framework proposed by Diez Roux and Mair (2012) health inequities can be addressed through neighborhood-level prevention strategies. Implementation of this framework requires environmental health metrics that describe the built environment, food environment, health care access environment, as well as exposures to carcinogens. There are a number of established composite metrics describing the built environment (e.g., walkability scores and sprawl/population density indices), the food environment (e.g., proximity scores to food outlets or retail food indices), and health care access environment (e.g., density of services or travel time to nearest facility). Additionally, there are numerous geographically-based metrics that are relevant to research in health disparities and chronic disease prevention, but they are not often used across disciplines or in public health. And for many research questions, appropriate metrics have yet to be developed. METRIC addresses these needs. This course will introduce METRIC to the cancer research, control and surveillance community.

Course Objectives

  • Understand the rationale, underlying theory, and implications of environmental cancer metrics for cancer research, prevention and control.
  • Be able to access and use the METRIC software as well as data already available in METRIC, including data layers from esri, Urban Design for Health, and public resources.
  • Know how to specify and calculate cancer metrics, including access via double catchment techniques, residential proximity, and travel times.
  • Create new environmental metrics using the metric editor.
  • Assess associations between environmental metrics and outcomes such as cancer rates using visualization and exploratory data analysis (e.g., histogram, scatterplot).
  • Rank results to identify geographic disparities and assess the impact of metrics definition (e.g., weights of components) on the relationship with health outcomes.

Requirements
Participants are encouraged to bring their laptops to step through the exercises. Access to METRIC 1.0 will be provided to registered course participants who have internet access.

Content
Content for each of the Presentation Objectives listed above will be covered, providing a comprehensive introduction to the METRIC software.

Course Organizer(s)

  • Geoffrey M. Jacquez, Pierre E Goovaerts

 

Match*Pro Training: Navigating the New Linkage Software Recommended for registries desiring to improve their linkage to external datasets

Sunday, June 9, 2019
1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
$195

This course will provide instruction on the use of Match*Pro linkage software developed by IMS, Inc. Attendees will learn about basic linkage concepts, receive instruction on Match*Pro software functionality, and have the opportunity to perform test linkages and explore the system capabilities.

Course Objectives

  • Ensure shared understanding of basic linkage concepts
  • Provide instructional overview of Match*Pro functionality
  • Give attendees hands-on experience working with test data
  • Increase knowledge of and familiarity with Match*Pro

Requirements
Attendees should bring a laptop with Match*Pro loaded in advance. Familiarity with linkage software and linkage processes is beneficial, but not required.

Content
A background on linkage concepts followed by description of Match*Pro system functionality, including blocking parameters, matching criteria, filtering results, match review process, report capabilities, creating output files, etc.

Course Organizers

  • Castine Clerkin, MS, CTR, Program Manager of Virtual Pooled Registry, NAACCR

 

Advanced SEER*Stat Software Training/SEER*Prep Presentation   revised and includes new topics appropriate for both NAACCR and International participants

Monday, June 10, 2019
8:30 am – 5:30 pm
$275

SEER*Stat Advanced Topics covers survival, limited-duration prevalence, multiple primary analysis, and left-truncated life tables analysis using SEER*Stat. Presentation of usage of SEER*Prep software to create SEER*Stat databases with NAACCR and international incidence data.

Course Objectives

  • Introduce advanced statistical topics in the analysis of cancer registry data and how data can be analyzed using these techniques within the SEER*Stat software.
  • Introduce users to new introduce users to the new international SEER*Prep incidence format and demonstrate the steps in creating a database.

Requirements

Basic SEER*Stat training course or workplace SEER*Stat experience. General familiarity with the analysis of registry data. Each participant must bring a laptop with a Windows operating system or a Windows emulator. If an emulator is used, then the participant should test compatibility with SEER*Stat prior to the conference.

Content

Survival analyses, including relative, cause-specific, and conditional survival; limited-duration prevalence; multiple primary standardized incidence ratios; and left-truncated life tables. Demonstration of SEER*Prep software.

Course Organizer(s)

  • Steve Scoppa, Senior Systems Analyst, Information Management Services, Inc.

 

Collecting Meaningful Qualitative Data: Focus Group Fundamentals and Qualitative Data Analyses  

Monday, June 10, 2019
8:00 am -12:00 pm
$195

This course will provide an overview of qualitative data collection, focus group fundamentals, and qualitative data analyses methods and software for cancer research. The utility of qualitative research and focus groups for enhancing cancer registry operations will be emphasized.

Course Objectives

  • Understand the importance and the role of qualitative data in cancer research
  • Understand the fundamentals and purposes of focus groups as a qualitative data collection method
  • Explore the logistics of recruiting, conducting, and analyzing a focus group
  • Improve understanding of qualitative data analyses and data collection strategies
  • Practice qualitative data collection scenarios and explore real-world possibilities for qualitative data collection in cancer research

Requirements: none

Content

Qualitative Data (Collection & Analyses); Focus Group Fundamentals; Qualitative Analyses Software; Thematic Summaries; Qualitative data/focus group interactive practice sessions.

Course Organizer(s)

  • Rebecca L Garrow, MPH, Program Manager, Cancer Registry of Greater California

 

Tools and Software to Automate and Normalize the Cancer Data Abstraction Workflow  

Monday, June 10, 2019
1:00 pm – 4:00 pm
$195

This course highlights several tools that can be used to enhance the quality of registry data and to automate certain tasks. Specifically, this course will introduce and demonstrate:
1) National Cancer Institute (NCI)’s Observational Research in Oncology Toolbox;
2) DeepPhe natural language processing (NLP) and visualization software;
3) NCI-DOE application programming interface (API);
4) HemOnc chemotherapy regimen ontology.

Course Objectives

  • Understand the tools available in the NCI’s Observational Research in Oncology Toolbox and consider how they might be incorporated into existing workflows.
  • Appreciate how natural language processing tools such as DeepPhe can aid in the abstraction process.
  • Appreciate the utility of APIs and how they may ease the data collection process.
  • Develop an understanding of how formal ontologic modeling of chemotherapy regimen concepts can increase the utility of cancer registry information.

Requirements

Presentations will cover technical details but are intended to be broadly inclusive and practical. The emphasis will be on the presentation of existing tools and software that could be utilized by central cancer registries and cancer researchers almost immediately.

Content
This tutorial will provide several perspectives on the state-of-the-art and challenges of extracting and visualizing cancer patient data. Further details are provided in the attached agenda.

Course Organizers

  • Jeremy Warner

NAACCR and IACR invite you to participate in the 2019 Combined Conference in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada as a sponsor and/or exhibitor.

Don’t miss this opportunity!

For over 30 years, the NAACCR annual conference has attracted cancer researchers, surveillance professionals, and representatives from government agencies, hospitals, and medical associations from the U.S., Canada, and all over the world. This year we have joined with IACR, for a combined conference in Vancouver. This is a unique opportunity to interact with many more international cancer surveillance experts. We want you to be a part of it!

  • Strengthen existing relationships and develop new ones
  • Showcase your products and services
  • Connect with leaders and decision makers of the cancer surveillance community
  • Support NAACCR and IACR in their missions

 

General Information

Exhibits and posters will be located in or near the ballroom where breakfasts and breaks are served.

Both exhibitors and sponsors are eligible for the NAACCR/IACR member early registration fee of $495 per person for individuals who staff the booth for your organization. To expedite the registration process, it is imperative that all persons from your organization who will be attending the conference are pre-registered, whether they are attending the sessions and/or staffing the booth space. We will then have their name badge and conference materials ready for them when they arrive to ensure a speedy and hassle free check-in. Name badges/exhibit hall access will not be issued to non-registered exhibitor staff.

 

Sponsorship Levels and Exhibit Information

Partner Level $7500 USD (Exclusive sponsorship opportunity)*

  • Six complimentary conference registrations
  • Sponsorship of the Splash Screen when opening the Conference Mobile Application
  • Partner Level designation at exhibit booth
  • Standard Booth Package in premium location
  • Logo on monitor at registration area
  • Acknowledgement from podium as a Partner Level Sponsor
  • Partner Sponsor designation ribbon for representatives
  • Company logo and link on NAACCR/IACR Conference web page until December 31, 2019
  • Organization listing and logo featured in the Final Conference Program as a Partner Level Sponsor
  • Sponsor “Thank You” link on the NAACCR/IACR conference page

Contributor Level $2500 USD (Three opportunities available)*

  • Banner Ad at the bottom of the Conference Mobile Application (choose Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday)
  • Logo on monitor at registration area
  • Acknowledgment from podium
  • Standard Booth Package
  • Includes one conference registration
  • Organization listing and logo featured in the Final Conference Program as a Contributor Level Sponsor
  • Sponsor “Thank You” link on the NAACCR/IACR conference page
  • Conference registrations at $495/attendee

Technology Spotlight $2000 USD*

  • 15 minute talking spot in the Exhibit Hall during a scheduled Session Break
  • A/V equipment included (monitor, podium, mic, laptop, speaker system)
  • Signage, seating included
  • Time and location of Technology Spotlight listed in the Final Conference Program
  • Organization listing and logo featured in the Final Conference Program

Exhibitor $1000 – $1,500

  • Standard Booth Package and one conference registration available for $1000 –or
  • Double Booth Package and one conference registration available for $1500
  • Organization’s Listing and Logo featured in the Final Conference Program
  • Additional conference registrations available for $495

*Registration for these opportunities closes on May 1, 2019.

 

STANDARD BOOTH PACKAGE INCLUDES:

  • 10′ x 10′ booth space
  • 6′ draped table
  • Two side chairs
  • 8′ high back drape
  • 3′ high side drape
  • One wastebasket
  • 7” x 44” Sign

DOUBLE BOOTH PACKAGE INCLUDES

  • 20′ x 10′ booth space
  • Two 6′ draped tables
  • Two side chairs
  • 8′ high back drape
  • 3′ high side drape
  • One wastebasket
  • 7” x 44” Sign

 

EXHIBIT HOURS:

  • Monday, June 10 – Set-up 1:00pm – 5:00pm*
  • Monday, June 10 – Pre-Conference Social 5:30pm – 7:00pm*
  • Tues., June 11 – Display hours 7:00am – 5:00pm*
  • Wed., June 12 – Display hours 7:00am – 1:30pm*
  • Thurs., June 13 – Display hours 7:00am – 3:30pm*
  • Thurs., June 13 – Dismantle 3:30pm – 5:00pm*

*Times are subject to change. Refer to the Final Conference Program for exact times.

Hotel Accommodations

The JW Marriott  Parq Vancouver is the host hotel and location for the combined conference. The downtown location makes it the ideal venue for the NAACCR conference. With Western Canada’s majestic mountaintops as its backdrop, JW Marriott Parq Vancouver delivers a luxury hotel experience unlike any other for our joint conference. Rooms and suites at our waterfront hotel showcase incredible city, ocean and mountain vistas. There’s a distinct sense of place with its understated luxury and impeccable service, but there’s no mistaking you’re in beautiful British Columbia. Replenish your spirit in this modern accommodation for the 2019 IACR / NAACCR combined conference.

JW Marriott Parq Vancouver
39 Smithe St, Vancouver, BC V6B 0R3, Canada
Telephone: 604-676-0888
JW Marriott Parq Web Site

A block of guest rooms has been reserved at the JW Marriott for participants of the 2019 Conference and Pre-conference workshops. A special rate has been negotiated at a discount for the conference. Rooms at conference rate of $249.00 CAD are subject to availability.

We encourage all delegates to book their accommodation at the JW Marriott.

Discounted Conference Rates (subject to availability)
Single Standard Room: $249.00 CAD – $375.00 CAD

Single Water View Room (Limited Quantity): $299.00 CAD – $375.00 CAD

All rates are subject to applicable taxes. Please note that these rates are quoted in Canadian dollars. The negotiated hotel rates are below U.S. Government Per Diem allocation for Vancouver in June.

Note: Based on available inventory, the reservation system may allow for rooms to be booked at the JW Marriott Parq Tower and / or the Marriott Douglas Tower. These two towers are the same conference building complex for the 2019 NAACCR/IACR Conference.

If the room block if full when you attempt to reserve your room, please check back. Rooms often become available as NAACCR and IACR members’ travel plans change.

NAACCR Room Block

Other Hotel Recomendations

Airport

Visit the Vancouver International Airport web site.  This resource will provide information on terminal maps, parking, ground transportation, dining, and an interactive flight map.

Transportation and Shuttle Options
Explore Vancouver!

Vancouver is home to many vibrant and interesting areas. Visit Tourism Vancouver for more information.

Landsea Tours: Delegates can book tours in and around Vancouver between June 6 & 16, 2019, using the promo code NAACCR2019 to get a 10% discount.

Activities During the Conference – Sign Up On Your Own or With A Group

 

  • NAACCR/IACR Conference Bike Outing, Wednesday, June 12
    Participants will meet in the hotel lobby for an entertaining and active guided bike tour around the False Creek area. Participants will leave from the hotel lobby and take a short 10 minute walk to the bike pick-up location. From there, they will embark on a guided leisurely-paced bike ride. The total bike ride time is approximately 45 minutes and approximately 12 km / 7.4 miles in length. After the ride, participants will meet back at the starting point and walk back to the hotel together.

$35 US fee includes:
– Bike and helmet rental
– Water bottle
– Tour guide
– Tour guide gratuity
Click here to register.

 

  • Vancouver Foodie Tours offer food tasting and cultural walking tours. Indulge in a feast for your eyes, belly and mind, tasting signature dishes at award-winning Vancouver gourmet restaurants, food shops and food trucks. Learn about the origin of ingredients, how dishes are prepared, as well as the history, culture, and architecture of Vancouver.

Tour starting points vary depending on tour.  All Tours take place within the Vancouver area.
Click 
here for tours and rates.

Click here for tours and rates.

  • Enjoy some of the best beer and wine the Vancouver has to offer. Award winning beer and wines in Vancouver and the Fraser valley, breath taking vistas. Let Canadian Craft Tours show you behind the scenes of a Vancouver Craft Brewery or local Fraser Valley winery.  All Tours take place within the Greater Vancouver area.

Click here for tours and rates.

  • Join professional Vancouver Whale Watch Guides for a 3 to 5-hour tour, departing from the picturesque West Coast fishing village of Steveston. Travel through the spectacular Gulf and San Juan Islands to find Orcas (Killer Whales) and Humpback Whales, you’ll have the opportunity to see a diverse marine ecosystem.

Click here for tours and rates.

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