2016 Annual Conference Oral Presentations

2016 Annual Conference Oral Presentations

TUESDAY, JUNE 14 CONFERENCE DAY 1

Keynote Address

Graham Colditz, DrPH, MD, MPH, Niess-Gain Professor of Surgery, School of Medicine; Associate Director of Prevention and Control, Siteman Cancer Center; and Deputy Director, Institute for Public Health, Washington University in St. Louis

Plenary Session #1

Plenary Session #2

NAACCR News

Update on the NAACCR Strategic Management Plan 2016-2021
Antoinette Stroup, PhD, NAACCR President-Elect

Virtual Pooled Registry Project
Castine Clerkin, MS, CTR, NAACCR Program Manager of Virtual Pooled Registry

Concurrent Session #1

01 – Triple Negative Breast Cancer and Factors Associated with Its Treatment in the U.S., 2011–2012 M. Wu, CDC, Atlanta, GA, United States

02 – Triple-Negative Breast Cancer in Georgia: Burden, Disparities, and Connections to Georgia’s Breast Cancer Genomics Program A.K. Berzen, Georgia Department of Public Health, Atlanta, GA, United States

03 – Breast Cancer Incidence in Marin County: A Hotspot Grows Cold? C. Clarke-Dur, Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont, CA, United States

04 – Utilization of Oncotype DX Test for Node-Negative, Hormone Receptor Positive, HER2 Negative Breast Cancers in the Community Setting X.C. Wu, LSU Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, United States

05 – Hispanic Childhood Leukemia Incidence in California: High and Rising B. Giddings, California Cancer Reporting and Epidemiologic Surveillance Program, UC Davis Health System, Institute for Population Health Improvement, Sacramento, CA, United States

06 – On Second Thought, Yes, We Do Have a Prevalence Estimate for Non-Malignant Brain Tumors! C. Kruchko, Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States (CBTRUS), Hinsdale, IL, United States

07 – Trends in the Lifetime Risk of Developing Cancer in Ontario, Canada H. Jiang, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, ON, Canada | University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

08 – Completeness of Required Site-Specific Factors for Brain and CNS Tumors in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) 18 Database (2004-2012, Varying) J.S. Barmholtz-Sloan, Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States (CBTRUS), Hinsdale, IL, United States | Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, United States

09 – Using NAACCR XML with Relational Databases I. Hands, Kentucky Cancer Registry, Lexington, KY, United States

10 – NAACCR XML in Action: from the SEER Abstracting Tool to SEER*DMS F. Depry, Information Management Services, Inc., Calverton, MD, United States

11 – How Bridging the Gap between VB6 and .Net Provides Efficiency for Automated Tumor Linkage Procedures in Registry Plus Central Registry Database Software M. Esterly, CDC/NPCR, Atlanta, GA, United States

12 – Florida Physician Claims Processing: From Collection to Implementation G. Levin, Florida Cancer Data System, Miami, FL, United States

13 – Unlocking the Power of Physician Medical Claims M. Hernandez, Florida Cancer Data System, University of Miami, Miami, FL, United States

14 – Assessment of Linkage of SEER Breast Cancer Cases to Oncotype DX Tests V. Petkov, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD, United States

15 – Improving Patient Demographics in Epath Reports and Timely Capture of Clinically Diagnosed Cancer Cases by Linkage with Hospitals’ Admission, Discharge, and Transfer (ADT) Data M.A. Lynch, Louisiana Tumor Registry, New Orleans, LA, United States

16 – Probabilistic and Deterministic Data Linkage Between Kentucky Cancer Registry Data and Health Claims Data B. Huang, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, United States

17 – Impact of Alternative Data Sources on Projected vs. Actual Case Counts R. Wilson, CDC, Atlanta, GA, United States

18 – Construction of a North American Cancer Survival Index to Measure Progress of Cancer Control Efforts C.J. Johnson, Cancer Data Registry of Idaho, Boise, ID, United States

19 – Modelling All-Cause Mortality to Produce Life Tables by Socio-Economic Status for Canadian Provinces D. Spika, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom

20 – Improving the Accuracy of Survival Estimates: Use of the SSA Epidemiology File to Identify Invalid Social Security Numbers P.S. Pinheiro, University of Nevada Las Vegas, School of Community Health Sciences, Las Vegas, NV, United States

S-01 – Incidence and Survival of Childhood Brain Tumors in California, 2004-2012 D. Rodriguez, Cancer Registry of Greater California, Public Health Institute, Sacramento, CA, United States | University of California Davis, Graduate Group in Epidemiology, Davis, CA, United States

S-02 – Progression Risk After Sphincter-Preserving Operations in Rectal Cancer: A Registry-Based Study from Arkhangelsk, Northwest Russia D. Dubovichenko, Northern State Medical University, Arkhangelsk, Russian Federation

S-03 – Survival from Ovarian Cancer by Morphological Subtype: Data on 676,987 Women in 61 Countries M. Matz, Cancer Research UK Cancer Survival Group, Department of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, England

S-04 – Usability Assessment of the Missouri Cancer Registry’s Published InstantAtlas Reports Using Health Professionals A. Ben Ramadan, University of Missouri Informatics Institute, Columbia, MO, United States | Missouri Cancer Registry and Research Center, Columbia, MO, United States | Health Management and Informatics Department/ School of Medicine/ University of MissouriColumbia, Columbia, MO, United States

S-05 – The Association between Insurance Status and Childhood Cancer Survival JM Lee, Brown School, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States

S-06 – Incidence of Triple Negative Breast Cancer in New Jersey, 2008-2013 A. Kulkarni, Rutgers School of Public Health, New Brunswick, NJ, United States

S-07 – Multilevel Correlates of In-Hospital Mortality Among Head and Neck Cancer Patients A. Adjei Boakye, Saint Louis University, Saint Louis, MO, United States

S-08 – End-Of-Life Costs of Breast and Cervical Cancer in Missouri’s Medicaid Program A. Bouras, School of Medicine Department of Health Management & Informatics (HMI), University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO, United States | Office of Social and Economic Data Analysis (OSEDA), University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO, United States | MU Informatics Institute, Columbia, MO, United States

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15CONFERENCE DAY 2

Plenary Session #3

Concurrent Session #2

21 – The SEER Virtual Tissue Repository Pilot: Leveraging Population-Based Biospecimens R. Moravec, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD, United States

22 – Quality of the KRAS Data in Population-Based Registries for Stage IV Colorectal Cancer Cases M.E. Charlton, University of Iowa College of Public Health, Iowa City, IA, United States | State Health Registry of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States

23 – Data Federation – A Cancer Registry and a Biobank D.J. Dale, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada

24 – National Program of Cancer Registries – Advancing E-Cancer Reporting and Registry Operations Project (NPCR-AERRO): Electronic Pathology (Epath) and Biomarker Synoptic Reporting Activities S. Jones, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, United States

25 – The Future of Cancer Registration in the Era of Electronic Health Records J. Rogers, CDC/NPCR, Atlanta, GA, United States

26 – Electronic Physician Reporting to State Cancer Registries …Present and Future W. Blumenthal, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, United States

27 – Meaningful Use Cancer Reporting in Maryland: What Do You Mean? C. Groves, Westat, Rockville, MD, United States

28 – Successful Onboarding of Physician Office Data for Meaningful Use Stage 2 Cancer Reporting N. Salahuddin, North Carolina Central Cancer Registry, Raleigh, NC, United States

29 – Development of a Natural Language Processing (NLP) Web Service for Structuring and Standardizing Unstructured Clinical Information S. Jones, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, United States

30 – Enhancing Capture of Detailed Oral Anticancer Medication Utilization in SEER by Leveraging an External Source of Pharmacy Data Q. Tran, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, United States

31 – Coordinated Data Development Initiative: Enhancing the Access to and Use of Standardized Treatment Data in Canada C. Louzado, Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, Toronto, ON, Canada

32 – Automated Language Processing of Free Text Medical Reports G. Cernile, Artificial Intelligence in Medicine, Inc., Toronto, ON, Canada

33 – Web Plus Survivorship Module: Where We Are and Where We Are Going A.B. Ryerson, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, United States

34 – Usage Patterns of a Web-Based Application Integrating Cancer Registry Data Into Survivorship Care Plans R.C. Vanderpool, University of Kentucky College of Public Health, Lexington, KY, United States

35 – Strategies to Maximize Data Quality Improvements and Enhancements W. Roshala, PHI/Cancer Registry of Greater California, Sacramento, CA, United States

36 – Visualizing a World with Less Cancer R. Rycroft, Colorado Central Cancer Registry, Denver, CO, United States

37 – Virtual Pooled Registry Pilot Linkages with Large Cohort Studies C. Clerkin, NAACCR, Springfield, IL, United States

38 – Virtual Pooled Registry Test Linkage Results Using Two Software Systems C. Clerkin, NAACCR, Springfield, IL, United States

39 – Value of a Central Institutional Review Board for Multi-Centered Studies Using the Virtual Pooled Registry S. Stoyanoff, Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program, Los Angeles, CA, United States

40 – Value of a Virtual Pooled Registry Process to Improve Data Quality in Central Registries L. Penberthy, NCI, Rockville, MD, United States


NAACCR Business Meeting

New Updates/FORDS Manual Updates

Cancer Surveillance Strategies in the Caribbean

THURSDAY, JUNE 16CONFERENCE DAY 3

Concurrent Session #3

41 – Trends in Colorectal Cancer Incidence in Younger Canadians, 1969-2010 P. De, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, ON, Canada

42 – The Risk of Colorectal Cancer is Increasing in Successive Birth Cohorts Since the Early 1950s R. Siegel, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA, United States

43 – Geographic Variation of Advanced Stage Colorectal Cancer in California J. Rico, California Department of Public Health/California Cancer Registry, Sacramento, CA, United States

44 – Meaningful Use in Practice: What Reporters Think J. Martin, Virginia Cancer Registry, Richmond, VA, United States

45 – Implementing Cancer Case Reporting from Ambulatory Electronic Health Records A.A. Austin, New York State Cancer Registry, Albany, NY, United States

46 – Assessment of the National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) Program Evaluation Instrument (PEI) S. Van Heest, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, United States

47 – Annual Versus Biennial Mammography Screening and Stage at Diagnosis of Breast Cancer in Illinois T.A. Dolecek, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States

48 – Gateway to Information: Using Data Visualization to Create Interactive Profiles for Cancer in Missouri by State Senatorial District J. Jackson-Thompson, Missouri Cancer Registry and Research Center, Columbia, MO, United States | University of Missouri (MU) School of Medicine Department of Health Management & Informatics, Columbia, MO, United States | MU Informatics Institute, Columbia, MO, United States

49 – Breast Cancer Prevention Among American Indian/Alaska Native Women in Missouri M. Taffa, T. Sparks, S. Kloeckner and S. Taluc, Kathryn M. Buder Center for American Indian Studies / Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States

50 – NPCR’S TNM Stage Calculator: A Tool for Central Registry Quality Control and Consolidation Assistance J. Seiffert, Northrop Grumman, Atlanta, GA, United States

51 – Comparison of TNM Assigned by Physicians Compared with Registry Reviewer Assigned: Results from a SEER Field Study P. Adamo, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, United States

52 – A Central Registry Reliability Study to Gauge Visual Editor TNM and Summary Stage Coding SkillsD. Hansen, California Cancer Registry, Sacramento, CA, United States

53 – Evaluation of Directly Coded AJCC Stage Data: One Large State’s Experience M.J. Schymura, New York State Cancer Registry, Albany, NY, United States

54 – Combined T, N, and M Based on Directly Coded Clinical and Pathologic T, N, and M: Evaluation of the Derivation Algorithm and Opportunities for Registrar Education and Computer Edits P. Adamo, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, United States

55 – Racial and Socio-Economic Disparities in Melanoma Incidence Rates in Georgia: 2000-2011 M. Freeman, CDC, Atlanta, GA, United States | ORISE, Oak Ridge, TN, United States

56 – Cancer-Specific Mortality and Racial Disparities Among Cancer Patients with Diabetes Mellitus C. Lam, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD, United States

57 – Survival Trends by Socioeconomic Status, 1998-2011: A Shift in Disparities for Colorectal Cancer Survival D. Holt, Westat, Rockville, MD, United States

58 – Examining Income Disparities in Lung Cancer Incidence, Mortality and Survival in Canada S. Fung, Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, Toronto, ON, Canada

Plenary Session #4

Concurrent Session #4

59 – Contributions of HIV to Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Mortality in the U.S. (2005-2012) E.A. Engels, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, United States

60 – HIV Infection Is Associated with Low 5-Year Relative Survival for Cancer Patients in Louisiana X.R. Li, Louisiana Tumor Registry, Epidemiology Program, LSUHSC, New Orleans, LA, United States

61 – Trends in Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma Incidence and Survival in the U.S. M. Shiels, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD, United States

62 – Enhancing Cancer Registry Research Recruitment Through Clinical Trial Applications: A Collaboration Between NJSCR and Clinical Performance Partners, Inc. N. Herman, New Jersey State Cancer Registry, Trenton, NJ, United States | Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, United States

63 – Accuracy of Self-Reported Cancer Diagnosis from the MY-Health Study Cohort Compared with Participating SEER Cancer Registries N. Herman, New Jersey State Cancer Registry, Trenton, NJ, United States | Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, United States

64 – New Jersey’s Research Management Solution: Our Gateway to Successful Population Based Cancer Research C.J. Harrell, CJH Consulting, Brighton, UT, United States

65 – Finding “Immortals”: Can Statistical Models Help? D. Nishri, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, ON, Canada

66 – Finding “Zombies” in Your Registry Database by Confirming Source Record Vital Status D.K. O’Brien, Alaska Cancer Registry, Anchorage, AK, United States

67 – Utilizing State Databases to Improve Follow-up: The Louisiana Vaccination Experience C. Lefante, Louisiana Tumor Registry, New Orleans, LA, United States | LSU Health Sciences Center; School of Public Health, New Orleans, LA, United States

68 – NAACCR V.16 Edits Metafile Update J. Hofferkamp, CTR, NAACCR, Springfiled, IL, United States

69 – AJCC Cancer Staging Manual, 8th Edition Update D. Gress, AJCC, Chicago, IL, United States

70 – Timing is the Key to AJCC TNM Staging D. Gress, AJCC, Chicago, IL, United States

71 – Trends in the Incidence of Thyroid Cancer, Israel, 1990-2012 B.G. Silverman, Israel National Cancer Registry, Israel Center for Disease Control, Israel Ministry of Health, Tel HaShomer, Israel | School of Public Health, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel

72 – Leading Causes of Cancer-Specific Mortality in the Caribbean Region H. Razzaghi, CDC, Atlanta, GA, United States

73 – Subsite of the Colon Cancer and Survival in 2000-2013: A Population-Based Analysis from the Arkhangelsk Oblast, North-Western Russia M.Y. Valkov, Northern State Medical University, Arkhangelsk, Russian Federation | Clinical Oncology Center, Arkhangelsk, Russian Federation

74 – World-Wide Variation in Breast Cancer Survival by Age, Stage and Morphology C. Allemani, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom

Concurrent Session #5

75 – Disparities in Cancer Incidence and Survival Between Indigenous and NonIndigenous Adults in Canada: Follow-up of the 1991 Canadian Census Cohort D. Nishri, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, ON, Canada

76 – Cancer Incidence and Mortality Patterns Among Chinese Americans D. Deapen, Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States

77 – Racial Disparities in Cancer Incidence, Staging, and Survival Among the Oldest Old in the United States J. Krok-Schoen, Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States

78 – The Alaska Native Tumor Registry: 45 Years of Cancer Surveillance Among Alaska Native People S.H. Nash, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK, United States

79 – Evaluation of Commercial Data Sources for Obtaining Individual Residential Histories for Cancer Research D. Stinchcomb, Westat, Inc., Rockville, MD, United States

80 – Easy Interactive Mapping of Cancer Data Revisited J.E.A. Bartholomew, Geowise Limited, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

81 – Responding to Community Concerns Regarding Cancer Incidence – The Role of the Israel National Cancer Registry B.G. Silverman, Israel National Cancer Registry, Israel Center for Disease Control, Israel Ministry of Health, Tel HaShomer, Israel | School of Public Health, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel

82 – Estimating Neighbourhood-Level Behavioural Risk Factor Prevalence from Large Population-Based Surveys: A Bayesian Approach L. Seliske, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, ON, Canada

83 – Differences Between Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Breast Cancer Patients: Molecular Subtypes and Survival R.D. Cress, Public Health Institute, Cancer Registry of Greater California, Sacramento, CA, United States

84 – Socio-Demographic Predictors of Survival Among Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Patients in California, 2003-2012 J. Morgan, Loma Linda University School of Public Health, Loma Linda, CA, United States | SEER Cancer Registry of Greater California, Loma Linda, CA, United States

85 – Invasive Cancer Incidence and Survival — United States, 2012 S. Singh, CDC, Atlanta, GA, United States

86 – Collection of Occupation and Industry Information through National Program of Cancer Registries Comparative Effectiveness Research Study M. Freeman, CDC, Atlanta, GA, United States | ORISE, Oak Ridge, TN, United States

87 – Use of Information Systems to Support NAACCR Death Clearance Standards L. Giljahn, Ohio Department of Health, Columbus, OH, United States

88 – Exploring the Efficacy of Using Disease Index to Improve Cancer Registry Data Completeness and Death Clearance Casefinding in Maryland W. Ross, Westat, Rockville, MD, United States

89 – Text: Can it Reduce Your DCO Burden? Youbetcha! L. Stephenson, Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System, Division of Public Health, Madison, WI, United States

90 – Analysis of External Databases to Ascertain Vital Status S. Van Heest, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, United States

91 – Sorting Out the Primary Payer Jumble, Part A: The Montana Experience L. Williamson, Montana Central Tumor Registry, Helena, MT, United States

92 – Sorting Out the Primary Payer Jumble, Part B: The U.S. Experience R.L. Sherman, NAACCR, Springfield, IL, United States

93 – Disparities in Quality of Care and Outcomes Among Cancer Patients in California: The Role of Health Insurance and Population Demographics A. Parikh-Patel, California Cancer Reporting and Epidemiologic Surveillance (CalCARES) Program, Institute for Population Health Improvement, UC Davis Health System, Sacramento, CA, United States

94 – Augmenting Kentucky Cancer Registry Data with Medicare, Medicaid and Private Insurance Claims Data B. Huang, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, United States

95 – Pitfalls and Opportunities Using Cancer Registry Data for Thyroid Cancer Research M.A. Whiteside, Tennessee Department of Health, Nashville, TN, United States

96 – IASLC 2011 and WHO 2015 Classifications of Lung Adenocarcinomas: Demographic Patterns, Trends, and Implications for Cancer Surveillance S. Negoita, Westat, Rockville, MD, United States

97 – Using Cancer Registry Data to Estimate the Percentage of Melanomas Attributable to UV ExposureM. Watson, CDC, Atlanta, GA, United States

Plenary Session #5

Late Breaker Session

Using Registry Data; Creating Cancer Control Indicators and the New CINA Public Data Set
Recinda Sherman, PhD, Program Manager of Data Use and Research, NAACCR

Caribbean Hub for the Global Initative for Cancer Registries
Glennis Andall-Brereton, PhD, Epideniologist/Senior Technical Officer, Caribbean Public Health Agency CARPHA

Invitation to 2017 Annual Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico

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