2015 Oral Presentations

2015 Oral Presentations

TUESDAY, JUNE 16  CONFERENCE DAY 1

Keynote Address

8:30 am – 9:15 am

The Right Treatment for the Right Patient at the Right Time: A Perspective on Personalized Cancer Medicine
Marie Davidian, PhD, Professor of Statistics, North Carolina State University

Plenary Session #1

10:30 am – 12:30 pm

Future of Cancer Surveillance

Moderator: Betsy A. Kohler

Speakers:

Concurrent Session #1

1:30 pm – 3:00 pm

Section A:

REGISTRY OPERATIONS: CASE ASCERTAINMENT

Moderator: Winny Roshala

01 Finding the Needle in the Haystack – The Clinically Diagnosed Cases
M. Potts, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

02 Using NPI and ePath to Identify Clinics That Treat or Diagnose Cancer
C. Klaus, North Carolina Central Cancer Registry

03 Quality Control of Alternate Data Sources in the Ontario Cancer Registry
M.J. King, Cancer Care Ontario

04 What Can We Learn About Case Ascertainment from Registries with High Incidence for Either Benign/Borderline Brain or In Situ Breast Cancers?
R.L. Sherman, NAACCR

Section B:

LAUNCHING A NEW ERA OF DATA TRANSMISSION – XML

Moderator: Gary M. Levin

05 Introduction to XML – How it Works and What it Offers Us
R. Pinder, Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program

06 Creating Transmitting, and Working with a NAACCR XML File
I. Hands, Kentucky Cancer Registry

07 XML Tools – Examples to Slice, Dice, Load, and Analyze XML Data
F. Depry, Information Management Services, Inc.

 

Section C:

CANCER SURVIVAL

Moderator: Hannah K. Weir

09 Preview of Registry-Specific and Aggregated Relative Survival Estimates in Cancer in North America
C.J. Johnson, Cancer Data Registry of Idaho

10 To What Extent Do National Wealth and Expenditure on Health Explain World-Wide Variation in Cancer Survival
C. Allemani, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

11 Lower Mortality Among Married Cancer Patients: How Much of The Effect is Explained by Socioeconomic and Health Insurance Status?
S. Gomez, Cancer Prevention Institute of California

12 Understanding International Disparities in Childhood Leukaemia Survival: A Worldwide Analysis from the CONCORD-2 Study
A. Bonaventure, Cancer Research UK Cancer Survival Group

Section D:

IMPROVING DATA QUALITY

Moderator: Susan T. Gershman

13 Using Cancer Registry Data to Evaluate Breast Cancer Incidence by Subtype
R.L Sherman, NAACCR

14 Completeness and Consistency of WHO Grade Assignment for Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors in the United States, 2004-2011
J. Barnholtz-Sloan, Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States

15 The Impact of Reporting Practices on State and Local Lip Cancer Rates, or: How Many per Million Depends on the Vermilion
F.P. Boscoe, New York State Cancer Registry

16 Quality Analysis and Coding Recommendations for Prostate Cancer Site Specific Factors, 2004-2012
J. Whitlock, Wayne State University School of Medicine

Section E:

LAUNCHING A NEW ERA OF SURVEILLANCE: BIOMARKERS AND PROGNOSTIC INDICATORS

Moderator: Frances Babcock

17 Determining How to Move Forward with Collection of Prognostic and Predictive Factors Known as CS SSFS
V. Petkov, National Cancer Institute

18 An In-Depth Study of KRAS Biomarker Testing in Colorectal Cancer Patients
A. Rico, CDC

19 Linking Oncotype DX Results to SEER Data and Patient-Report to Assess Challenges in Individualizing Breast Cancer Care
A. Hamilton, Keck School of Medicine

20 Use of the Oncotype DX Assay Among California Breast Cancer Patients – An Analysis of Linked Databases
R.D. Cress, Public Health Institute/Cancer Registry of Greater California

Concurrent Session #2

3:30 pm – 5:00 pm

Section A:

REGISTRY OPERATIONS IMPROVING DATA QUALITY

Moderator: John Keighly

21 Focused Audits – A Novel Approach to Monitoring Data Quality in the Central Registry
C. Moody, California Cancer Registry

22 Assessing the Completeness of Birthplace Information Collected by the California Cancer Registry
L. Liu, Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program

23 Cancer Registry of Greater California (CRGC) Identifies Adolescent Cases Considered Lost to Follow Up In Order to Improve Follow Up
G. Halvorson, Cancer Registry of Greater California

24 Understanding and Developing Approaches for Addressing Differential Follow-Up Among Asian and Hispanic Cancer Cases
S. Gomez, Cancer Prevention Institute of California

Section B:

LAUNCING A NEW ERA IN DATA LINKAGE

Moderator: David P. Butterworth

25 Use of Alternate Information to Improve Linkage with the National Death Index (NDI)
E. Miller, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

26 Linking Cancer Registries and Birth Defects Registries for Clues on Genetic Cancer Risk
G. Copeland, Michigan Cancer Surveillance System

28 Health Status of Florida Cancer Survivors: Linkage of the 1986-2009 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) with the 1981-2010 Florida Cancer Data System (FCDS)
D.J. Lee, University of Miami

Section C:

CANCER PATTERNS

Moderator: Laura P. Ruppert

29 When will Cancer Become the Leading Cause of Death in the United States?
H. Weir, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

30 2011 US Burden of Cancer by Race and Ethnicity
J. Lortet-Tieulent, American Cancer Society

31 Changes in Most Common Cancers in Canada
L. Xie, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention

32 Estimating the Impact of Childhood Cancer in the United States: Years of Life Lived with Disease and Years of Potential Life Lost, 2009
J. Barnholtz-Sloan, Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States

Section D:

LAUNCHING A NEW ERA OF CANCER STAGING

Moderator: Kim A. Vriends

33 Survey of Users of Staging Data: What Data is Used, What Data Should be Collected?
J. Brierley, Canadian Partnership Against Cancer

34 SEER 2014 Training Assessment for TNM Staging
A-M. Noone, National Cancer Institute

35 Evaluation of TNM Staging Data in a Large Volume of Cancer Pathology Reports Using Automated Data Extraction and Analysis
C. Kosary, National Cancer Institute

36 Discordance and Missing of Staging Information in Cancer Registry Data: Implications for CER in Bladder Cancer
K. Meng, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Section E:

A NEW ERA IN DATA INTERPRETATION

Moderator: Netta N. Apedoe

37 Changing Incidence of Hodgkin Lymphoma Histologic Subtypes: Risk Factor Trends or Evolving Diagnostic Practice?
S. Glaser, Cancer Prevention Institute of California

38 Evaluation of Completeness of Lymph Node Count in the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries for Selected Cancers
H.M. Sineshaw, American Cancer Society

39 Has Improved Imaging Contributed to Reduced Size at Diagnosis for Stage I Lung Adenocarcinomas?
J.W. Morgan, Loma Linda University School of Public Health

40 Population-Based Testing and Treatment Characteristics for CML
T. Styles, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17CONFERENCE DAY 2

Plenary Session #2

8:30 am – 9:45 am

Big Data!

Moderator: Lynne Penberthy

Speakers:

  • Unleashing “Big Data” in Oncology
    Robert Green, MD MSCE, Vice President of Clinical Strategy, Flatiron Health, Inc.
  • Big Data Infrastructure for Cancer Outcomes
    Anne-Marie Meyer, Faculty Director, ICISS, UNC

Concurrent Session #3

10:00 am – 11:30 am

Section A:

REGISTRY OPERATIONS LAUNCHING A NEW ERA IN QUALITY IMPROVEMENT

Moderator: Cheryl Moody

41 A New Era of Data Quality Assurance and Process Improvement
W. Roshala, PHI/Cancer Registry of Greater California, Sacramento

42 Remedy to Reduce Death Certificate Only Cases
S. Radhakrishnan, North Carolina Cancer Registry

43 A Review of 2012 Diagnosis Year Cases Submitted from Seven Pathology Laboratories in Illinois
L. Koch, Illinois State Cancer Registry

44 Engaging Regional Cancer Centre Healthcare Professionals in Identifying Cancer Surveillance Informational Needs
N. Solimani, Cancer Care Ontario

Section B:

PROJECTIONS, PREVALENCE AND PARTITIONS

Moderator: Brenda K. Edwards

45 Early Estimates of SEER Cancer Incidence for 2012
D.R. Lewis, National Cancer Institute

46 Projecting Cancer Prevalence: Finding the Best Methods For Ontario’s Cancer System Planning
D. Nishri, Cancer Care Ontario

47 Use of Incidence-Based Mortality (IBM) Tool to Partition Trends in Mortality by Tumor Subtypes: Application to Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) Cancer
N. Howlader, NCI/NIH

48 Reducing Confounding Bias in Registry-Linked Data Through Propensity Score Methods
Y.K. Chang, Lineberger, UNC-CH

Section C:

LAUNCHING A NEW ERA IN GEOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS

Moderator: Recinda Sherman

49 Assessing Fitness for Use of Two Indicators of the Rural-Urban Environment in the NAACCR Data Files
K.A. Henry, Temple University

50 County Measures and Cancer Survival for Lung and Colorectal Cancer in Appalachian Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia
B. Huang, University of Kentucky

51 Mapping with Cancer, Demographic and Behavioral Risk Data
C. Schmaltz, Missouri Cancer Registry and Research Center

52 Are Distance Based on Addresses Better than ZIP Codes for Assessing Geographic Access to Cancer Treatment?
T. Kuo, LCCC, UNC-CH

Section D:

LAUNCHING A NEW ERA IN CANCER CONTROL

Moderator: Jeannette Jackson-Thompson

53 Building Capacity for Cancer Control Action: the IARC Regional Hub for Cancer Registration in the Caribbean
D. Martin, National Cancer Institute

54 Profiling Cancer Within Select Ontario Aboriginal Reserves
M.V. Prummel, Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario

55 Smoking Behavior Among Adult Childhood Cancer Survivors: What Are We Missing?
T. Asfar, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

56 Use of Patient Focus Group Data with Cancer Registry Data to Support PersonCentered System Performance Reporting
K. Tran, Canadian Partnership Against Cancer

Section E:

NEW ERA IN RESEARCH: CERVICAL CANCER SURVEILLANCE

Moderator: Deirdre B. Rogers

57 Surveillance of Cervical Cancer Precursors in Four U.S. Central Cancer Registries
M. Watson, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

58 Audit of Case Finding Completeness and Accuracy in Four Registries Collecting Cervical Cancer Precursors
M. Watson, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

59 HPV Genotype Prevalence Among Kentucky Women Diagnosed with Pre-Invasive Cervical Cancer: Using the Central Cancer Registry as a Population-Based Virtual Tissue Repository
T. Tucker, University of Kentucky

60 Leveraging Electronic Pathology Reporting in Cervical Cancer Epidemiology: Determinants of Invasive Diagnoses in Kentucky
E. Durbin, Kentucky Cancer Registry

THURSDAY, JUNE 18CONFERENCE DAY 3

Concurrent Session #4

8:00 am – 9:30 am

Section A:

REGISTRY OPERATIONS IMPROVING MANAGEMENT

Moderator: Marta Induni

61 The Last Frontier; True Modernization of a Cancer Registry’s Electronic Communication
K. Ziegler, Cancer Registry of Greater California

62 Using SEER*Educate Management Reports to Target Training Needs
M. Potts, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

63 Better Communication Starts with Team Work
N. Lozon, Metropolitan Detroit Cancer Surveillance System

64 Benefits and Challenges of Going Paperless: Implementation of a Document Management and Workflow System
C. Hamma, Public Health Institute / Cancer Registry of Greater California

Section B:

MEANINGFUL USE

Moderator: Joseph Dean Rogers

65 Meaningful Use of Electronic Health Records: Electronic Physician Reporting to State Cancer Registries
W. Blumenthal, CDC

66 North Carolina Central Cancer Registry (NCCCR) and Meaningful Use Stage 2 Cancer Reporting
N. Salahuddin, NC DHHS

67 Meaningful Use Stage 3: Potential Impact on Central Cancer Registries
J. Jackson-Thompson, University of Missouri (MU) School of Medicine Department of Health Management & Informatics

68 Putting it into Practice: Challenges Implementing MU2 in Florida
M. Hernandez, Florida Cancer Data System

Section C:

SURVIVAL METHODS

Moderator: Christopher Johnson

69 The Impact of the “Presumed Alive” Follow-up Method on Survival Rates by Race/Ethnicity and National Origin in New York
M.J. Schymura, New York State Cancer Registry

70 Constructing Life Tables for Global Surveillance of Cancer Survival: Experience from the CONCORD-2 Study
D. Spika, Cancer Research UK Cancer Survival Group, Department of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

71 Multiple Mediation Analysis with Survival Data: An Application to Analyze Racial Disparity in Stage III Colon Cancer Survival
M.C. Hsieh, Louisiana Tumor Registry and Epidemiology Program, School of Public Health, LSU Health Sciences Center

72 Development of New NPCR SAS Tool for Population-Based Cancer Relative Survival Analysis
K. Zhang, ICF International

Section D:

LAUNCHING A NEW ERA IN SURVEILLANCE AND CANCER OUTCOMES

Moderator: David K. O’Brien

73 Using Enhanced Registry Data for Clinical Management and Cancer Care V.W. Chen, Louisiana Tumor Registry and Epidemiology Program, School of Public Health
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

74 Variation In Staging and Treatment of Rectal Cancer by National Cancer Institute (NCI) Designation and Medical School Affiliation: Analysis of Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare Data
M.E. Charlton, University of Iowa College of Public Health

75 Prevalence and Characteristics of Cancer Patients Seeking Care from Multiple Facilities, San Francisco Bay Area of California, 2010-11
S. Glaser, Cancer Prevention Institute of California

76 Quality of Care and Outcomes Among Cancer Patients in California According to Source of Health Insurance
A. Parikh-Patel, California Cancer Reporting and Epidemiologic Surveillance (CalCARES) Program, Institute for Population Health Improvement, UC Davis Health System

Section E:

CANCER EPIDEMIOLOGY

Moderator: Kathy Cronin

77 Increasing Trends of Kidney and Renal Pelvis Cancer in California
A. Parikh-Patel, California Cancer Reporting and Epidemiologic Surveillance (CalCARES) Program

78 Trends in Early Stage Hepatocellular Carcinoma, California 1988-2011
D. Ewing, Cancer Registry of Greater California

79 Breast Cancer Among the U.S. Male Population
R. Wilson, CDC/NCCDPHP/DCPC/CSB

80 Stomach Cancer in North America: Geographic Variation in Net Survival by Age And Sex
H. Carreira, Cancer Research UK Cancer Survival Group

Plenary Session #3

10:00 am – 11:30 am

Launching a New Era in Registry Operations

Moderator: Maureen MacIntyre

Speakers:

  • NCI SEER Transition Tools – Moving to More Modern Technologies
    Jean Cyr, Assistant Project Manager and Senior Systems Analyst, Information Management Systems, Inc.
  • Launching a New Era in Registry Operations: Survivorship Care Plans
    Randi Rycroft, CTR Director, Colorado Central Cancer Registry
  • Data Item Consolidation
    Frances Ross, CTR, Director of Registry Operations, Kentucky Cancer Registry
  • The New Death Clearance Manual
    Susan Bolick, MSPH, CTR, Director, South Carolina Cancer Registry
  • Reporting Delay Adjustment for NAACCR Registries
    Eric Feuer, PhD, Branch Chief, Surveillance Research Program, National Cancer Institute

Concurrent Session #5

1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Section A:

ISSUES OF RACE

Moderator: Jim Martin

81 Plans for Multi-Race Reporting of Death Data
E. Arias, CDC/NCHS

82 Feasibility of Multi-Race Reporting for Cancer Incidence
D. G. Stinchcomb, Westat

83 Statistical Issues of Bridging Single-Race and Multiple-Race Reports in the Population Data
M. Yu, National Cancer Institute

84 Clarifying Race Reporting in New Jersey
L. Paddock, New Jersey State Cancer Registry

Section B:

LAUNCHING A NEW ERA OF STANDARDS AND AUTOMATION

Moderator: Lori Havener

85 Automating the Multiple Primary Rules
P. Ransdell, Kentucky Cancer Registry

86 Real Time Discrete Data Elements from Synoptic Radiology Reports to Enhance Cancer Registry Operations
G. Lee, Cancer Care Ontario

87 Comparing a Standard (NAACCR Volume V) with a Draft Standard (HL7 Version 2.5.1 Implementation Guide: ELR Reporting to Public Health, Release 2)
J.N. Harrison, New York State Cancer Registry

88 Use of Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) Standardized Data Capture (SDC) Content Profile to Exchange Standardized Data Between Clinical Care and Cancer Registries
S. Jones, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Section C:

CANCER CLUSTERS AND ANALYTIC TOOLS

Moderator: Bruce Riddle

89 Lung Cancer Incidence in a Rural Montana County Undergoing Asbestos Screening, 2000-2008
L. Williamson, Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services

90 Investigation of a Possible Link between Pollution from WWII Military Facilities and Cancer in Yakutat, Alaska
D.K. O’Brien, Alaska Cancer Registry

91 Confidence Intervals for Rate Ratios Between Geographic Units
L. Zhu, National Cancer Institute

92 Model-Based Small Area Estimation for Cancer Screening and Smoking Related Behaviors
B. Liu, National Cancer Institute

Section D:

MOVING TOWARD IMPROVED SURVEILLANCE OF TREATMENT AND OUTCOMES

Moderator: Amanda Shaw

93 Nonclinical Factors Associated with Premature Termination of Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Stage I-III Breast Cancer
X. Wu, LSU Health Sciences Center

94 The Effect of Comorbidity on the Use of Adjuvant Chemotherapy and Type of Regimen for Resected Stage III Colon Cancer Patients
M.C. Hsieh, Louisiana Tumor Registry and Epidemiology Program

95 “First in Flight” or “When Pigs Fly” – Can Cancer Registries Play a Critical Role at the National Level in Studying Cancer as an Adverse Outcome from Drug Treatments?
K. Midkiff, RTI Health Solutions

96 Long-term Cancer Surveillance: Five-Year Update for the Forteo Patient Registry Data Linkage Study
D. Harris, RTI Health Solutions

Closing Plenary Session #4

3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Intersection of Public Health Surveillance and Clinical Medicine

Moderator: Jill MacKinnon

Speakers:

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